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THIS BOOK 

IS AFFECTIONATELY DEDICATED 

by 

THE CLASS OF 1912 

to 

DEAN ARNOLD 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 20i2 with funding from 

Federally funded with LSTA funds through the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners 



http://archive.org/details/microcosm1912simm 



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®\)t g>tmmott£( College Annual 

PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENTS 
OF SIMMONS COLLEGE 
BOSTON :: :: MASSACHUSETTS 



VOLUME THREE 



Simmons College 

Boston, Massachusetts 

1912 




FOREWORD 

HE A^icrocosm Board wishes here to acknowledge their great 
indebtedness to those who have so kindly contributed time, 
thought, and material toward making the 1912 Microcosm a 
success: 

In Art: 

Dr. Stiles, Alice Charlton, Lillian Nisbet, Sarah F. Whitney, Wilda 
Strong, E. Josephine Pippey, Mia Rosenblad, Mary Tulis, Ruby Bateman, 
Elizabeth Shurtleff, Nellie Swanburg, E. B. Baker, Leanna Hicks. 

In Literature: 

Miss Arnold, Miss Martha Wentworth Suffren, Dr. Farley. 

We also apologize for the somewhat radical changes we have effected 
and hope that they may meet with some measure of approval from those 
who "read it through." 




0>NTENT 



PAGE 

Alumnae Association 45 

Athletics 115 

Calendar, 1911-1912 .... 13 

Classes: 

1912 51 

1913 ....... 80 

1914.. 85 

1915 ..... 91 

Unclassified Students 97 

College Organizations: 

The Student Guild .... .. 103 

The Student Government Asso 105 

Vespers 113 

Glee Club .... . Ill 

Mandolin Club 113 

Corporation .... 14 

Faculty 15 



PAGE 

In Memoriam 

Instructors ... — - 25 

Microchaos ..... 129 

Our College ... 40 

Seniors 49 

Simmons College Athletic Asso. 107 

Basket Ball ..... . 119 

Tennis 117 

Track Events ..... . 122 

Social Events: 

Social Calendar, 1911-1912 126 

Junior Prom 128 

The College Door 35 

The 1912 Microcosm 109 

1912 Class Song .... 48 

1912 Stereopticon 52 




1911-12 



1911 
September 11-16 
September 18, 19 
September 18-20 
September 20 
October 12 
November 30-December 2 
December 19 



1912 




January 


2 


February 


3 


February 


5 


February 


22 


March 


21 


April 


2 


April 


19 


May 


30 


May 


27-June 7 


June 


12 


June 


17-22 


July 


9-August 17 



Entrance examinations 
Registration 
Condition examinations 
Opening of the College Year 
Columbus Day, a holiday 
Thanksgiving Recess 
College closes at noon 
Christmas Vacation 



College opens at 9 a.m. 

End of the first term 

Opening of the second term 

Washington's Birthday, a holiday 

College closes at noon 

Spring Vacation 

College opens at 9 a.m. 

Patriots' Day, a holiday 

Memorial Day, a holiday 

Final examinations 

Commencement Day 

College Entrance Board examinations 

The summer classes 

13 




HENRY LEFAVOUR, Ph.D., LL.D., Boston, President 

ROBERT TREAT PAINE, 2d, A.B., Boston, Treasurer 

JOHN WASHBURN BARTOL, A.B., M.D., Boston, Clerk 

FRANCES BAKER AMES, Boston 

FRANCES ROLLINS MORSE, Boston 

WILLIAM THOMPSON SEDGWICK, Ph.D., Sc.D., Brookline 

JOSEPH BANGS WARNER, A.M., LL.B., Cambridge 

MARY MORTON KEHEW, Boston 

HORATIO APPLETON LAMB, A.B., Milton 

GEORGE HENRY ELLIS, West Newton 

MARION McGREGOR NOYES, A.M., Winchester 

GUY LOWELL, A.B., S.B., Brookline 

MARY ELEANOR WILLIAMS, Brookline 

EDWARD DESHON BRANDEGEE, A.B., Brookline 



14 





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HENRY LEFAVOUR, Ph.D., LL.D., Presi- 
dent. A.B., Williams College, 1883; Ph.D., 
Williams College, 1886; LL.D., Wil- 
liams College, 1902; Tufts College, 1905. 

Additional course, University of Berlin. 

Instructor in Williston Seminary; Professor and Dean of 
Williams College; President of Simmons College from 1902. 

Phi Beta Kappa, Trustee Williams College, Trustee Boston 
State Hospital, Chairman Massachusetts Commission on 
Minimum Wage Boards, Colonial Society of Massachusetts, 
American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Trustee Society 
for the Preservation of New England Antiquities, Fellow 
American Association for the Advancement of Science, New 
England Historic Genealogical Society, American Economic 
Association, American Sociological Association; Director 
Hale House Association, Executive Committee North Bennet 
Street Industrial School, St. Botolph Club, Boston City Club, 
City Club of New York. 




SARAH LOUISE ARNOLD, Dean and Pro- 
fessor of the Theory and Practice of 
Education. A.M., Tufts. 

Principal of Schools, St. Johnsbury, Vt.; Principal of 
Training School for Teachers, Saratoga, N. Y.; Supervisor of 
Primary Schools, Minneapolis, Minn.; Supervisor of Schools, 
Boston, Mass. 

Publications: Waymarks for Teachers; Reading, How to 
Teach It; Stepping Stones to Literature (with C. D. Gilbert); 
The Mother Tongue (with George L. Kittredge), With Pencil 
and Pen; General Articles on Education. 

Member Mayflower Club; Social Education Club; of 
Executive Committee of Women's Education Association, 
Boston; of Board of Trustees, Women's Educational and In- 
dustrial Union; National Council of Education; Massachu- 
setts State Board of Edu 



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JAMES FLACK NORRIS, Professor of 
Chemistry. A.B., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 
University. 

Work at the Technische Hochschule Karlsruke, 1910-1911. 

Assistant Professor of Organic Chemistry, Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology. 

Publications: Author of about thirty papers on Inorganic 
and Organic Chemistry, published in American and German 
Chemical Journals. 

Phi Beta Kappa, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 
American Chemical Society, Die Deutsche Chemische Gesell- 
schaft, American Association for the Advancement of Science, 
Chemistry Teachers' Association of New England, Examiner 
in Chemistry of College Entrance Examination Board, 
American Home Economics Association, Technology Club. 




FRANK EDGAR FARLEY, Professor of 
English. A.B., Harvard, 1893; A.M., 
Harvard, 1894; Ph.D., Harvard, 1897. 

Assistant in English, Harvard University; Assistant in 
English, Radcliffe College; Instructor in English, Haverford 
College; Professor of English, Syracuse University. 

Publications: Author of Scandinavian Influences in the 
English Romantic Movement, 1903. Editor of Milton's Para- 
dise Lost, 1898. 




*ALFRED BULL NICHOLS, A.B., Pro- 
fessor of Gentian. A.B., Yale Univer- 
sity, 1880. 

*On leave of absence. 



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JEFFREY A. BRACKETT, A.B., Ph.D., 

Associate Professor of the Theory and 
Practice of Philanthropic Work, and 
Director of the School for Social Workers. 
A.B., Harvard University, 1883; Ph.D., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1889. 

President Department Charities of Baltimore, Mary- 
land; President National Conference of Charities and Cor- 
rection; Director of School for Social Workers, Boston, from 
1904. 

Author of Supervision and Education in Charity, 1901. 

Massachusetts State Board of Charity. 

REGINALD RUSDEN GOODELL, A.B., 

A.M., Associate Professor of Romance 
Languages. Bowdoin College. 

Additional courses, Johns Hopkins University, The Sor- 
bonne, Grenoble, L'Alliance Francaise. 

Instructor at Bowdoin College; Instructor at M. I- T.; 
Associate Professor from 1902. 

Editor of V Enfant Espion and Other Stories. 

Delta Kappa Epilson, Phi Kappa Phi, Technology Club, 
Modern Language Association, Salon Francais de Boston. 

EDWARD HENRY ELDRIDGE, Asso- 
ciate Professor of Secretarial Studies. 
Temple University, A.M., 1903; Tem- 
ple University, Ph.D., 1907. 

Special work in Psychology at University of Chicago, 
University of Pennsylvania, Clark University. Two years at 
Amherst College. 

Stenographer in a business house; Secretary to President 
Gates at Amherst College; Secretary to President Conwell, of 
Temple University; Professor of Psychology at Temple Uni- 
versity; Director of School of Business at Temple University. 

Publications: Hypnotism, Penn Publishing Company, 
1910; Shorthand Dictation Exercises, American Book Com- 
pany, 1909; Expert Typewriting, co-author with Miss Rose L. 
Fritz, American Book Company, 1912. 

Delta Upsilon, Vice-President, Alumni Association of 
Temple University, President of the Eastern Commercial 
Teachers' Association, Secretary of Committee on Standardi- 
zation, National Shorthand Reporters' Association; Secretary 
of Contest Committee, National Shorthand Reporters' 
Association. 

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CHARLES KNOWLES BOLTON, Associate 
Professor of Library Science. A.B., Har- 
vard College. 

Librarian Boston Athenaeum. 

Publications: Saskia, the Wife of Rembrandt, The Private 
Soldier under Washington, Scotch Irish Pioneers in Ulster and 
America, Two Chapters in A. L. A. Man mil of Library Science. 
Editor Letters of Hugh Earl Percy and of the Athemeum Cen- 

Phi Beta Kappa (honorary) at Harvard; President, So- 
ciety for the Preservation of New England Antiquities; Treas- 
urer, New England Historical Genealogic Society; Chairman, 
Visiting Committee to Library Museum of Fine Arts; Mem- 
ber, Visiting Committee to Library Harvard University; 
Trustee of Donations for Education in Liberia; Member, 
Massachusetts Hi 




SUSAN MYRA KINGSBURY, Associate 
Professor of Economics. A.B., Univer- 
sity of the Pacific; A.M., Leland Stan- 
ford Junior University; Ph.D., Colum- 
bia University. 

Teacher of History in the San Francisco Lowell High 
School, Instructor in History at Vassar College, Supervisor of 
Investigation under the Massachusetts Commission on In- 
dustrial and Technical Education. 

Publications: Records of the Virginia Company; report on 
The Relation of Children to .he Industries 

Kappa Alpha Theta Fraternity, American Historical 
Association, New England History Teachers' Association. 



9 



MARY ESTHER ROBBINS, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Library Science and Librarian. 

Graduate New York State Library School. 

Librarian, New Britain Institute, New Britain, Conn. 
Head Cataloguer, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Neb. 
Organizer of various libraries East and West for five years 
Instructor in Charge, Summer Library School, Chautauqua 
N. Y.; Simmons College from 1902. 

Publications: Articles in professional journals. 

Member of the Council, American Library Associatior 
Fellow American Library Institute; Bibliographical Societ 
of America, Massachusetts Library Club. 




I 1 ' 



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MARIA MILLETT HOWARD, Assistant 
Professor of Household Economics. 



Principal of Boston Cooking School, Lecturer on Home 



- V 



KENNETH L. MARK, A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry. Har- 
vard University, A.B., 1898; A.M. 
1900; Ph.D., 1903. 



Assistant in Chemistry, Harvard University; I 
in Chemistry, Simmons College; Assistant Professor 
1906. 

Author of Thermal Expansion oj Gases. 

Delta Upsilon, American Chemical Society. 



LESLIE LYLE CAMPBELL, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Physics. M.A., Ph.D., Wash- 
ington and Lee University; A.M., Har- 
vard University. 

Assistant in Mathematics, Washington and Lee University; 
Assistant in Physics, Harvard; Professor Physics, Westmin- 

Publications: Thomson Effect, Hall Effect, Nernst Effect, 
Ledite Effect, Ettingshausen Effect in Soft Iron, Thermo-Electric 
Heterogeneity in Alloys. 

Fellow American Association for Advancement of Science; 
Member American Physical Society,' Member Eastern Asso- 
ciation of Physics Teachers, Member Mathematical and 
Physical Club, Member National Geographical Society; 
Member Congo Reform Association, Member Phi Beta Kappa. 



20 



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PERCY GOLDTHWAIT STILES, Assist- 
ant Professor of Physiology since 1907. 
S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1897; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 
University, 1902. 

Post-graduate student at Johns Hopkins, 1899-1902. 

Instructor, Bellevue Medical College, 1902-1903; In- 
structor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1903- ; 
Instructor, Simmons College, 1904-1907. 

Publications: Sundry scientific papers and reviews. 

American Physiological Society, Society for Experimental 
Biology and Medicine. 



ERNST HERMANN PAUL GROSS- 
MANN, A.B., Assistant Professor of Ger- 
man. Berlin Normal College; A.B., 
Harvard University, 1902. 

Instructor at Harvard University; Instructor, Simmons 
College, 1904-08; Assistant Professor, Simmons College, 
from 1908. 



CHARLES MARSHALL UNDERWOOD, 
Jr., A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Romance Languages. Harvard 
University, 1900; A.M., Harvard Uni- 
versity, 1901; Ph.D., Harvard Univer- 
sity, 1905. 

Additional courses, University of Paris, University of 
Grenoble. 

Instructor, Harvard University; Dartmouth College. Uni- 
versity of Cincinnati; Instructor, Simmons College, 1907-08; 
Assistant Professor, Simmons College, from 1908. 

21 



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ARTHUR IRVING ANDREWS, Assistant 
Professor of History. A.B., Brown Uni- 
versity, 1901; Ph.D., Harvard Univer- 
sity, 1905. 

University of Wisconsin, 1901-02. 

Assistant at Harvard University, 1906-08; Instructor of 
History, Simmons College, 1906-09; Assistant Professor of 
History, Simmons College, 1909-12; Associate Professor of 
History, Tufts College, 1911. 

Publications: Various reviews and some small articles. 

American Historical Association, American Political 
Science Association, American International Law Association, 
Institute de Carthage, Tunis; Delta Upsilon Fraternity, 
Harvard History Club, American Society, New England 
History Teachers' Association, Brown University Teachers' 
Association. 

FREDERIC AUSTIN OGG, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of History. Ph.B., De Pauw Uni- 
versity, 1899; A.M., University of In- 
diana, 1900; A.M., Harvard University, 
1904; Ph.D., Harvard University, 1908. 

Instructor in History, University of Indiana, 1902-03; 
Fellow and Assistant in History, Harvard University, 1904-07; 
Instructor in History, Simmons College, 1905-09; Assistant 
Professor of History, Simmons College, 1909-11. 

Publications; The Opening of the Mississippi (New York, 
Macmillan, 1904); Source Book of Medieval History (New 
York, American Book Co., 1908); Edited Fordham's Narrative 
of a Journey through the West, 1817-1818 (Cleveland, Clark, 
1906). 

Beta Theta Pi, Phi Beta Kappa, American Historical 
Association, American Economic Association, American 
Political Science Association, American Geographic Society. 



JAMES HOLLY HANFORD, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of English. A.B., University of 
Rochester, 1904; A.M., Harvard, 1907; 
Ph.D., Harvard, 1909. 

Teacher of English, East High School, Rochester, N. Y., 
1904-06; Assistant in English, Harvard, 1908. 

Publications: The Pastoral Elegy and Milton s Lycidas, in 
publications of the Modern Language Association of America, 
xxv, 3; Classical Eclogue and Medieval Debate, in the Romanic 
Review, ii, 1 and 2. 

Psi L'psilon, Modern Language Association of America. 



22 



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HARRY CLARK BENTLEY, Assistant 
Professor of Secretarial Studies. B.C.S., 
New York University; C.P.A. (Certi- 
fied Public Accountant) under the laws 
of New Jersey, Connecticut, and Massa- 
chusetts. 

Conducted a private school in Winsted, Conn., for three 
years; Senior Accountant with Smith, Reckitt, Clarke & Co., 
Certified Public Accountants; The Manhattan Audit Co.; 
The Audit Company of New York; and Member of the firm 
of Bentley & Laird, Certified Public Accountants, all of New- 
York; Assistant Professor, Simmons College, from 1910. 

Publications: Corporation Finance and Accounting, 1908; 
Science of Accounts, 1910; Series of articles in the Journal of 
Accountancy on "Standardization of Accounting Forms and 
Methods," 1912, and other articles on Accountancy subjects. 

Fellow of the American Association of Public Accountants, 
Fellow of the New Jersey State Society of Certified Public 
Accountants, Member of the American Economic Association. 



ALICE FRANCES BLOOD, Ph.D., Assist- 
ant Professor in Chemistry. S.B., Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology, 1903; 
Ph.D., Yale University, 1910. 



Instructor in Simmons College, 1904-08; Assistant Pro- 
fessor in Simmons College from 1910. 

Sigma Xi, American Chemical Society, Association of 
Collegiate Alumnae, Association of the Women of the Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology, American Home Economics 

Publications: Some Peculiarities of the Proteolytic Activity 
of Pap-pain (with L. B. Mendel); The Erepsin of the Cabbage. 



GEORGE PRESTON BACON, Assistant 
Professor of Physics. A.M., Dartmouth. 

At the University of Michigan and the University of 
Berlin. 

Peekskill Military Academy, Instructor in Science; Beloit 
College Academy, Assistant Principal; Beloit College, Asso- 
ciate Professor of Mathematics; University of Wooster, Pro- 
fessor of Physics. 

Theta Delta Chi, Phi Beta Kappa, American Physical 
Society, American Astronomical and Astrophysical Society. 






23 



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SOPHRONIA MARIA ELLIOTT, Assistant 
Professor of Household Economics. 

Botany, Chemistry, and English at Harvard; Chemistry, 
Bacteriology, Sanitary Science, Biology at Institute of Tech- 
nology; Zoology, Paleontology, Physiology, Cryptogamic 
Botany, at Teachers' School of Science; Private Instruction in 
Laundering, Cooking; Boston Public Schools, School of 
Housekeeping. 

Publications: Chemistry of Cooking and Cleaning (joint 
author with Mrs. Ellen H. Richards), Household Bacteriology, 
Household Hygiene, articles in numerous magazines and daily 
papers. 

Health Education League, Boston, 1915, Ed. Section, 
Teachers' School of Science, Women of Technology Associa- 
tion, New England Home Economics Association, American 
Home Economics Association. 



ZILPHA DREW SMITH, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of the Theory and Practice of 
Philanthropic Work. 

General Secretary, Associated Charities of Boston, for 
about twenty-five years. 

Publications: Occasional articles in National Conference 
of Charities, The Survey, etc. 

Monday Evening Club, Board of Tuckerman School, one 
of Trustees of Hawk's Trust (educational), now and then 
Examiner for Civil Service positions related to Social Work. 



EVELYN WALKER. A.B., Bryn Mawi 
College. Secretary to the Faculty. 

Secretary, Bryn Mawr College; Assistant Secretary, Miss 
Winsor's School. 




ALICE NORTON DIKE, Instructor in Household Economics. B.L., 
Smith College. 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology; School of Housekeeping; Teacher, Robinson Seminary, 
Exeter, N. H.; Teacher, School of Housekeeping, Boston. 



MARGARETA ELWINA MITZLAFF, Instructor in German. German 
Government Diploma as Teacher of High Schools. 

Special work at Radcliffe. 
Private School, Wellesley College. 

CAROLINE JEWELL COOK, A.B., LL.B., Instructor in Commerica! Law. 

EVA LOUISE MARGUERITE MOTTET (Brevet Superieur), Instructor 
in French. College of Alontbeliard, France. 

Additional course, Romance Philology. 

Instructor, Wellesley College; Instructor, Simmons College, from 1903. 

FRANCES SEDGWICK WIGGIN, Instructor in Library Science. B.L., 
University of Wisconsin. 

Library Organizer, Librarian of Colorado College Library. 

EDITH ARTHUR BECKLER, Instructor in Biology. S.B., Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology. 

MYRA COFFIN HOLBROOK, Instructor in English. A.B., Vassar; 
A.M., Wesleyan. 

Virginia College, Roanoke, Va.; Wesleyan Academy, Wilbraham, Mass. 

25 



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HELEN JACKSON, Instructor in Secretarial Studies. A.B., Mount 
Holyoke; B.S., Simmons. 



JANE BOIT PATTEN, S.B., Instructor in Biology. Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology, 1906. 

Additional courses, at Technische Hochschule, Dresden, Germany. 
Instructor, Simmons College, from 1906. 



ELIZABETH ALLISON STARK, Instructor in Secretarial Studies. A.B., 
Wellesley College; S.B., Simmons College. 

Assistant to Registrar, Wellesley College; Secretary to President's Secretary, Wellesley College. 



GERTRUDE WILLISTON CRAIG, Instructor in Secretarial Studies. 
Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Secretary, President National Biscuit Company; Secretary, Advertising Manager Review of Re- 
views; Secretary, Commercial Department American Book Company. 



ARTHUR STONE DEWING, Instructor in Psychology and Ethics. A.B., 
Harvard University, 1902; A.M., Harvard University, 1903; Ph.D., 
Harvard University, 1905. 

Instructor in Economics, Harvard University; Assistant in Philosophy, Harvard University. 

Publications : Books — History Modern Philosophy, Life as Reality, Laboratory Note Books in 
Chemistry and Biology. Periodicals — Articles on Science Teaching in School Science and Education, 
articles on Mendel's Law and Hereditary in American Naturalist, and similar publications; articles on 
Modern Philosophy in Philosophical Review; articles on Logical Subjects in Journal of Philosophy, 
Psychology, and Scientific Methods; articles on Corporation Finance and Preorganization of Corporations 
in Quarterly Journal af Economics. 

American Economics Association. 



HARRIET ROSA PECK, Instructor in the Summer Library Class. B. L., 
Mt. Holyoke, 1902; B. L. S., New York State Library School, 1904. 

Assistant, Carnegie Library, Pittsburgh, Pa.; Instructor, Summer Library School, Chautauqua, 
N. Y.; Instructor, McGill University Summer Library Class, Montreal, P. Q.; Assistant, Gloversville 
Free Library, Gloversville, N. Y.; Cataloguer, Bates College Library, Lewiston, Me.; Librarian, Rens- 
selaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, N. Y. 

American Library Association, New York State Library Association. 

26 



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AMY SACKER, Instructor in Decoration and Design. 

Housebuilding Course. 

Society of Arts and Crafts, Boston; Copley Society, Boston. 

Manager of The Amy M. Sacker School of Design, 739 Boylston Street, Boston. 

CLARA DELLA CAMPBELL, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Instructor in Romance 
Languages. Allegheny College. 

Instructor, Simmons College, from 190S. 
Kappa Alpha Theta, Phi Beta Kappa. 

ELLA JOSEPHINE SPOONER, Instructor in Sewing. Graduate of 
Framingham Normal School. 

Harvard Summer School; Simmons College, 1905-06; Columbia Summer School, 1909 and 1911. 

Instructor, Perkins Institution for the Blind; Private Teaching, Boston Trade School for Girls, 
Andover Guild Evening Classes; Andover Guild Summer School, 1908 and 1910; Simmons College, 
1907- 

American Home Economics Association, New England Home Economics Association, Eastern 
Manual Training and Art Teachers' Association, Society for the Promotion of Industrial Education. 



FLORENCE S. DIALL, Instructor of Physical Training. Graduate Sargent 
Normal School Physical Education. 

Wood's Hole Marine Biological Lab, De Pauw University; Physical Director Y. W. C. A, Terre 
Haute, Ind.; Instructor, Vassar College. 
KAO. 
American Physical Education Association. 

CHARLOTTE PENNIMAN EBBETS, Instructor in Household Economics. 
Graduate of Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y. (Diploma.) 

Summer work at Teachers' College, New York, in " Dietetics," and " Chemistry of Nutrition." 
Instructor in Public Evening Schools, New York City; Dietetian Hahnemann Hospital, New York 

City. 

National American Home Economic Society, New England Branch Home Economics Society, 

Daughters of the American Revolution Society. 

ISADORE GILBERT MUDGE, Ph.B., B.L.S., Instructor in Library 
Science. Cornell University, 1897; B.L.S., New York State Library 
School, 1900. 

Reference Librarian and Assistant Professor of Library Economy, University of Illinois; Librarian, 
Bryn Mawr College; Instructor, Simmons College, from 1910; Reference Librarian, Columbia L"ni- 
versity. 

A Thackeray Dictionary, joint author with M. E. Sears. 

Kappa Alpha Theta, Phi Beta Kappa, American Library Association, American Bibliographical 
Society, New York Library Club. 

27 



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ANNETTE FOLLETT CHASE, Instructor in Household Economics. 
Graduate Pratt Institute, 1903. 

Dietetics, Physiological Chemistry, Nutrition and Psychology at Teachers' College, 1910. 

Instructor in Home Economics, State Normal College, Ypsilanti, Mich., 1903-05; Pratt Institute, 
1905-10; Farmers' Institute Lecturer, University of Maine, 1910-11; Instructor, Summer Course, 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1911. 



ISABELLA MITCHELL COOPER, Instructor in Library Science. A.B., 
Barnard; A.M., Columbia; B.L.S., New York State Library School. 

Teacher, Weingart Institute, New York City; Assistant Instructor, New York Public Library 
Training Class; First Assistant, Muhlenberg Branch, New York Public Library; Instructor Iowa State 
University Library Summer School; Reference Librarian, Free Public Library, Newark, N. J. 

Publications: Dictionary Catalogue of First Five Hundred Volumes of Everyman's Library. 

Zeta Theta Pi, Teacher's College, Columbia University, American Library Association, New York 
State Library Association, New York Library Club, Barnard Alumnae Association, Teachers' College 
Alumnae Association, New York State Library School Alumni Association. 



JANE ERNISSE CROWE, Instructor in English. A.B., University of 
Rochester, 1905; A.M., 1909; A.M., Columbia University, 1910. 

Teacher of English and History, Fairport High School, Fairport, N. Y., 1905-06; I 
Modern Language. Geneva College. Beaver Falls, Pa.. 1907-08. 

Phi Beta Kappa, Theta Eta (Local, University of Rochester). 



GORHAM WALLER HARRIS, Instructor in Chemistry. A.B., Harvard, 
1907; A.M., Harvard, 1909. 

Research at Harvard, 1909-10. 

Medford High School, April, 1907, June, 1908; Assistant and Teaching Fellow, Harvard, 1908-10. 

<1>BK (Harvard), American Chemical Society, Association of Harvard Chemists. 



LAURA KATHERINE JOHNSON, Instructor in Physics. A.B., Cornell 
University, 1910. 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
•J>BK. 



ALICE MABEL JORDAN, Instructor in Library Science. 



Chief of Children's Department, Boston Public Librar 
28 



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BLANCHE LEONARD MORSE, Instructor in Decoration and Design. 
B.A., Smith College. 



The Amy M. Sacker Courses in Decorative Design. 
Charge of The Amy M. Sacker School, 1910-1 1. 
College Club, Smith Alumna:. 



ABBY JOSEPHINE SPEAR, Instructor in Millinery. 



MARY BOSWORTH STOCKING, Instructor in Household Economics. 
Simmons College, 1910. 

Lewis Institute, Chicago, 111. 

Assistant in Household Economics at Simmons College; Teacher of Domestic Science at Robinson 
Seminary, Exeter, N. H. 

American Home Economics Association, New England Home Economics Association, Simmons 
Club of Boston. 



MASON WHITING TYLER, Instructor in History. A.B., Amherst Col- 
lege, 1906; A.M., Harvard University, 1908; Ph.D., Harvard Uni- 
versity, 1911. 

Marietta Academy, Instructor in History, 1906-7; Instructor in History, Simmons College, 1910- . 

Publications: Article on Bulgaria in July number of Journal of Race Development. 

*T, <£>BK, American Historical Association, New England History Teachers' Association. 



CAROLINE D. ABORN, Instructor. Education 4, Psychology of Child 
Life. 

Director of Kindergartens, Boston, Mass. 

Twentieth Century Club, Boston; International Kindergarten Union; Boston Teachers' Club, 
New England Federation of Kindergarten Clubs. 



FLORENCE TOLMAN BLUNT, Instructor in Summer Library Class. 
B.L., Mt. Holyoke College, 1896; A.B., Mt. Holvoke College, 1899; 
B.L.S., New York State Library School, 1903. 

Summer Course, Invertebrate Zoology, Woods Hole, Mass. 1S96; Summer Course, New York 
State Library School, 1901. 

Reference Librarian and Classifier, Public Library, Haverhill, Mass., 1903- . 
Mt. Holyoke College, American Library Association, Massachusetts Library Club. 

29 



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MILLEDGE L. BONHAM, Jr., Instructor in History. B. Lit., Furman, 
1900; A.M., Columbia, 1910; Ph.D., Columbia, 1911. 

Summer School, University of Virginia, 1903. 

Comdt. Cadets, New Orleans, La., 1900-01; Comdt. Cadets, Ky. Mil. Inst, 1901-03; Comdt. 
Cadets, Wilmington, Del., 1903-05; Richmond (Va.) High School, 1905-06; Principal Public School, 
Richmond, Va., 1906-09; Headmaster, Private School, New York City, 1909-10; Professor History, 
Virginia Summer Normal, 1906-07; Assistant in History, Summer Session, Columbia 1910-11. 

Publications: The British Consuls in the Confederacy, Longmans, 1911; various short articles in 
educational journals. 

American Historical Association, New England History Teachers' Association. 

RUTH BRYANT, Instructor in Biology. Simmons College, S.B. 

F. STUART CHAPIN, Instructor in Economics. Columbia College, New 
York City, B.S.; Columbia University, New York City, M.A.; 
Columbia University, New York City, Ph.D. 



Instructor in Mathematics, Manual Training High School, 1909-10, Brooklyn, N. Y.; 
Sociology, Colorado University Summer Session School, 1910; Instructor in Economics, Wellesley Col- 
lege, 1911. 

Publications: Report on Questionnaire of Committee on Teaching (of Sociology in Colleges of United 
States), in American Journal of Sociology, May, 1911; Education and the Mores, A Sociological Essay on 
Education, Colorado University Press, 1911. 

American Sociological Society, American Economic As 

Fellow in Sociology, Columbia University, 1910-11 



FRANCES RATHBONE COE, Instructor in Library Science. Graduate 
of the Pratt Institute School of Library Science. Special courses 
of study. 

American Literature, under Professor Gilmore, of Rochester University. 

Member of Buffalo Public Library Staff; Head of Open Shelf Department; Head of Circulating 
Department, Newark, N. J., Free Public Library; Librarian of Free Public Library, East Orange, N. J. 
Various articles in the Library Journal, Public Libraries, New York Libraries. 
Woman's Club of Orange. 

MARGARET COFFIN, Instructor in Household Economics. A.B., Uni- 
versity of Tennessee; B.S., Columbia University. 

Psychology and History, Summer School of the South. 

Assistant Teachers' College, Columbia University; Director of D. S., State Normal School, Stevens 
Point, Wis.; Director of D. S., Y. W. C. A., Omaha, Neb. 

American Association of Home Economics, American School of Home Economics, Chi Omega, 
Phi Kappa Phi, Young Women's Christian Association. 

30 



tKfje jWicrocoSm 



LESLIE BRIGGS COOMBS, Instructor in Chemistry. A.B., Harvard, 1909; 
S.M., Harvard, 1911. 

Head Assistant in Qualitative Chemistry, Harvard, 1909-11. 

Alpha Phi Sigma Society, American Chemical Society, Graduate Association of Harvard Chemists. 

BEULAH CLARK HATCH, Instructor in Household Economics. S.B., 
Simmons College. 

Instructor in Domestic Science, Pennsylvania State College. 

HELEN REBECCA HILDRETH, Instructor in Trade School Education. 
B. S. in Education, Columbia University (Teachers' College). 

Grades, Public Schools, Minneapolis; Grades, Horace Mann School, Teachers' College; Principal 
Garden City, Long Island; Executive Secretary, Manhattan Trade School for Girls; State Trade 
School, Girls' Department, New Britain, Conn. 

Delta Sigma (Local Teachers' College), North Bennet Street School Board. 

MARGERY HUGHES, Instructor in Saving. 

Lima Kindergarten (Assistant), Howe, Indiana; Santee Normal Training School (Teacher), Santee 
Neb.; Assistant Instructor, Simmons College, 1909-10, 1910-11. 
Tau Kappa Pi, Woman's College of Baltimore, Baltimore, Aid. 

CHARLES WILLIAM LEMMI, Instructor in English. M.A., Harvard. 
Diploma, Scientific Designer of R. Istituto Tecnico G. Galilei, 
Florence, Italy. 

One year at R. Istituto di Studi Superiori, Florence, Italy. 

Section-master and Instructor in French and Nature-Study at Camp Marienfeld, New Hamp- 
shire, U. S. A. 

Publications: Some translations in Rhirta Fiorentina," and little poem in Atlantic Monthly. 



HENRIETTA WILLARD LOCKE, Instructor in Chemistry. A.B., 
Radcliffe, 1909. 

Special work in Chemistry at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Chemist for Dragon Dyes, New York City, 1909-10; Teacher of Mathematics and Science at 
Wykeham Rise, Washington, Conn., 1910-11. 
Science Club and Music Club at Radcliffe. 

MARIE G. LUNDBERG, Supervisor of the Teaching of Household Eco- 
nomics in Social Settlements. Framingham Normal School. 

One-year special course at Simmons. 

Grade work in Public Schools of Northampton, New Bedford, and Waltham. 



tEfje fHtcrocosm 



EZRA KEMPTON MAXFIELD, Instructor in English. A.B., Colby 
College, 1905; A.M., Harvard, 1911. 

University of Pennsylvania. 

Principal,' Waldoboro (Maine) H. S., 1905-6; Instructor, Friends' Central School, Philadelphia, 
1906-S; Instructor, Delaware State College, 1909-10; Acting Professor of English at Haverford Col- 
lege, 1911. 

Publications: Delaware College Bulletin, Vol. VI. No. 4. December, 1910. Suggestions for Note 
Taking. 

Delta Upsilon. 

LILLIAN AZUBA PHILLIPS, Instructor in Domestic Art. Smith Col- 
lege (two and one-half years) ; Graduate of Massachusetts Normal 
Art School and Fitchburg Normal School. 

At Columbia University. 

Supervisor, Manual Arts, Woonsocket, R. I.; Supervisor, Manual Arts, Fitchburg State Normal 
School 

Publications: Magazine articles. 

Member, Eastern Manual Training and Drawing Association; Member, National Society for Pro- 
motion of Industrial Education, Smith College Club. 

Spent some time in Europe investigating Industrial Education. 

HANS WOLDO RABE, Instructor in German. A.B., c.l., Harvard. 

Graduate work at Harvard. 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1907-08. 

Harvard Deutsche Verein, Modern Language Association, Sprachverein. 

CECILIA MINNA SILLCOX, Instructor in Chemistry. B.A., from Bar- 
nard, College 1908; M.A., from Columbia University, 1911. 

Assistant in Chemistry at Barnard College, 1909-11. 
Alpha Omicron Pi Fraternity. 

ALICE FREEMAN WALMSLEY, Instructor in Institutional Management. 
B.A., Wellesley, 1906. 

Boston University, Institute of Technology, One-year Graduate Work at Wellesley College. 
Resident Settlement Worker, Denison House, Boston, Manager, Wellesley Inn, Wellesley, Mass. 
Home Economics Association. 

ABBY L. SARGENT, Lecturer on Cutter Classification. Salem Normal 
School. 

Librarian, Wilmington, North Carolina; Middlesex Mechanics Association, Lowell; Medford 
Public Library. 

American Peace Society, Appalachian Mountain Club, Massachusetts Library Club, American 
Library Association, National Geog. Society. 

32 



QTfje jfflicrocosm 



WILLIAM THOMPSON SEDGWICK, Ph.B., Ph.D., Lecturer on Sani- 
tary Science and Public Health. Ph.B., Yale University, 1877; 
Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1881. 

Professor of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Biologist to Massachusetts Board 
of Health; Curator Lowell Institute, Boston; Trustee, Simmons College; Lecturer, Simmons College, 
from 1902. 

General Biology; Principles of Sanitary Science and Public Health. 

St. Botolph Club, Warren Farm Golf Club, Board of Directors, Sharon Sanitarium. 

ELIOT THWING PUTNAM, Lecturer on Architecture. A.B., Harvard. 

Instructor in Architecture at Harvard. 

F. MELBOURNE GREEN. B.L., California, 1892; Ph.D., Berlin, 1908. 

How to Enjoy Art, ten lectures at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, October, December, 19H- 
^Esthetic Contrasts between Modern Masters; ten lectures, Boston Public Library, Saturdays, 10.30, 
no v in progress. 

Universally Extensive Lecturer, California, 1901. 

Publications: In prospect. (1) Development of Style in the Imitative Arts from the Origin of the 
Present Day; (2)//o:c to Enjoy Art. a Concrete Drill in ^Esthetic Appreciation; (3) .Esthetic Contrasts 
between Modern Masters. 

Resided in Europe, with occasional visits home, from 1892 to 190S. 

GERTRUDE LEE ALLISON, Assistant in the Library. S.B., Simmons. 
MARION GAGE, Assistant in Household Economics. 

Boston Cooking School, Physics at Columbia Summer School. 

Assistant Dietetian at State Sanitarium, Rutland, Mass.; Teacher of Cookery, Boston Public 
School; Teacher of Cookery at Robinson Seminary, Exeter, N. H. 

New England Home Economics Association, National Home Economics Association. 

HELEN GOLLER, Assistant in Secretarial Studies. Wellesley College, 
A.B.; Simmons College, B.S. 

Secretarial position in Philadelphia. 

CHARLOTTE FARRINGTON BABCOCK. Assistant in English. Rad- 
cliffe, A.B., A.M. 

Teacher at Miss Carroll's School, Boston; Teacher at Misses Smith's School, Cambridge; Private 
Tutoring. 

Radcliffe Alumna? Association, Radcliffe Union, President of Radcliffe Graduate Club. 



&fje ifltcrocofiim 



GERTRUDE FRANCES BARBOUR, Assistant in Biology. S.B., Sim- 
mons College, 1910; S.M., Simmons College, 1911. 

Sewing Classes, Quincy Evening School; Sewing and Cooking Classes, Misses Allen's School for 
Girls, West Newton. 

FRANCES ROUSMANIERE DEWING, Assistant in Psychology and 
Ethics. Wellesley, A.B., 1900; A.M., 1904, Radcliffe, Ph.D., 1906. 

Instructor in Mathematics and later in Philosophy at Mt. Holyoke College; Instructor in Philos- 
ophy at Smith College. 

Publications: Two articles in the Journal of Philospky, Psychology, and Scientific Methods. One 
article in Vol. II of Harvard Psychological Studies. 

American Philosophical Association, American Psychological Association, Association for the Ad- 
: of Science, Agra Society of Wellesley College. 



MARTHA WELLS HENRY, Assistant in Household Economics. 

One-year Institutional Management at Simmons College. 
Teaching, Charlemont, Mass. 

HELEN LUITWIELER, Assistant in the Library. A.B., Smith College, 
1910. 

One-year college graduate course at Simmons College. 

Apprentice for two months in the Springfield City Library; Assistant for one month for the Massa- 
chusetts Free Public Library Commission. 

ELSIE EVELYN MORSE, Assistant in Household Economics. S.B., 
Simmons College, 1911. 

MADELAINE LUELLAH SCOTT, Assistant in Secretarial Studies. Sim- 
mons College, B.S., 1911. 



MARGARET BLISS STEBBINS, Assistant in Sewing. Simmons Col- 
lege, S.B. 

MARGUERITE DOROTHEA TSCHALER, Assistant in Physics. A.B., 
Boston University, Class 1911. 

Graduate Courses in Philosophy and Physics. 

Cambridge Evening Schools. 

Epsilon Chapter of the Phi Beta Kappa, Gamma Gamma Delta, Doura Club. 

JENNIE BLAKENEY WILKINSON, Assistant in Secretarial Studies. 
S.B., Simmons, 1911. 

34 



ffijje College Boor 



Stately and fair by the broad highway 

Stands the hall with its walls of brown: — 
Its windows look across the Fens 

To the heart of the busy town, 
With its round, gray dome and its lofty spires, 
With the chimneys that tell of its factory fires ;■ 

And beyond, both river and sea, — 

They tell to me. 



And its windows look to the setting sun, 

With its clouds of crimson and gold, 
That blazon the west when the day is done, 

And the tale of the task is told; 
Past the river-way, with the church, square-towered, 
Past the neighboring houses, elm embowered 

To the hills and the fields so free, 

So fair to see. 



Wide o'erhead is the sky outspread 

From the hills to the city's rim: 
O'er the Fenway's edge with its shrub and sedge 

The swift-winged swallows skim, 
And dip o'er the roses, red and white: — 
But still is waiting the fairest sight, 

Till the sweet-faced girls appear, 

Who gather here. 



All for them the brown-walled college waits; 

'Tis for them I constant stand; 
They set me here to open wide 

At the touch of the student's hand; — 
Good to see is the gathering throng 
That comes with laughter, and ebbs with song! 

In greeting and in pride, 

I open wide. 

35 



Ctjc fHiccocofim 



Through the year you may hear in the morning hours 

The swift and eager feet; 
You may catch the cheery laugh and song, 

Or snatch the greeting sweet, 
As the current of young life enters in, 
With its bubbling mirth and its merry din, 

Through my portal, open wide 

To the welcome tide. 

Eagerly pouring in, they pass 

Through the corridors wide and high, 
Out of sight up the broad stairways 

They haste to pass me by: 
For lesson and task await them here; 
For this they gather from far and near: 

They say — (I have heard them speak) 

'Tis the truth they seek. 

How it is won, I cannot say, — 

For I at my post abide; 
But I open oft to other hands; 

Yes — open free and wide, 
For the springing step and the face serene, 
Or the slower pace and the serious mien 

That tell me the teachers come 

To the college home. 

Then the girlish voices blend 

With the deeper tones, that tell 
Of the life-task wrought, and the earnest thought 

And the lesson learned full well; 
Manly strength and womanly grace 
Meet at the task the upturned face 

Of the asking listeners here, 

Seeking the gifts they bear. 

How these are given, I cannot know; 

I stand, where they set me here; 
But as the footsteps come and go, 

I can but see and hear. 
And true it is that the earnest face 
Of the man, life-taught, and the woman's grace 

Bring to the heart of youth 

The living truth. 

36 



QTtje fflitvott.&m 



The staircase says: (but I cannot count 

His youthful judgment truth; 
He stays inside, nor looks abroad 

As I always must, forsooth.) 
He says that he learns a thousand things 
Each day, in the news that the chatter brings, 

I judge as he tells them forth 

Their real worth. 



He says that they think, this throng of g: 

That in books is the treasure hid; 
That its token is sealed in a roll of white, 

And to win it their days are sped. 
But some there be who are heard to say 
That other gifts have come their way, 

As they meet in the college halls 

Where the lesson calls. 



And this I learn, as the hours fleet by 
And the footsteps outward go; 

And I swing aside, to let them pass 
(I must, for they made me so) : 

For the echoing voices tell to me 

(What I ever know, and always see) : 
That they bear away each year 
What they brought not here. 



I myself have seen that the girlish face 

To the woman's changes soon; 
As the May time's color and early grace 

Make way for the wealth of June; 
And friends who came by two or three 
Move now in a larger company; 

And the mirth gives place to cheer; 

And serious lines appear. 

37 



W)t jffltcrocosm 



And I hear, as the new grace comes, 

The tone unheard before; 
Then I know that the open heart has found 

The truth that it waited for; 
But no one can tell me the mystery, 
And I hear them say, that some there be 

Who, seeming to hear, hear not, — 

And striving, yet fail to see. 

I can only wonder and wait; 

When the ebb tide passes by 
I eagerly scan each youthful face 

For the message it brings to me; 
For the hearing ear and the seeing eye 
For reverence meet; for sympathy; 

I ask and ask again 

Nor seek in vain. 



As the year swings into June 

The lingering steps are slow; 
I open wide as the footsteps near; 

I am loth to let them go. 
Yet doors that swing for entering feet 
Must open once — (and the years are fleet) 

For the last outgoing tide; 

Must open wide. 

Yet the two, I know, are one; 
The Master made me so; 
For the eager coming steps I wait; 
And, too, I must let them go. 
Yet ill-content I must ever be 
Unless, in each face as it goes, I see 

That the task has been fairly done, 
And the truth is won. 
38 



QFJjc dfflicrocosm 



Welcome — I've said it oft; 

Farewell — I must say it now; 
The echoing voices, sweet and soft, 

Are sweeter and more low; 
I gaze on each fair retreating face 
With grateful praise for the woman's grace 

That it bears away 

To-day. 




39 



®uv College 

Sarah Louise Arnold 



What sort of thing is an institution ? The name in itself does not appeal 
to the spirit of youth; it does not conjure fair dreams nor awake loving 
memories. Is it a machine, a bargain, a company? How many of us can 
give offhand a definition which will suffice? 

Whatever the term may mean, it is clear that it is used and properly 
used to apply to a college, even to our college. It may not be amiss to 
inquire what this institution, Simmons College, is and what it stands for. 

I have been asked to reply to this question and I have chosen to describe 
the college in human terms, leaving to others who are far more able, to 
present it as an academic organization. 

I think first of the clear-headed, far-seeing, constructive and able man, 
who, by means of keen intellect, accurate judgment, self-denial, self-control, 
foresight and farsight, had gathered together a reasonable fortune. The 
fate which left him without sons to continue his name and the necessity 
of making a wise investment of the fortune which he had accumulated, led 
him to consider means by which the community might be profited by his 
endeavors. It would be interesting if we might trace back to the first sug- 
gestion which found lodgment in his mind, leading in the end to the endow- 
ment of the college. Interest in the general problem there must have been; 
some personal experiences which had given concreteness to the plan out- 
lined for him by a high-minded and imaginative friend. Certain it is that 
the suggestion fell upon good ground; the seed took root, grew, and multi- 
plied a hundred fold, until the vision was clear and the determination was 
assured. John Simmons would devise and bequeath his fortune to "found 
and endow an institution to be called Simmons Female College," which 
should "furnish to women instruction and training in such branches of art, 
science, and industry as may be serviceable in enabling them to acquire a 
livelihood." 

The life of this institution, then, found its first expression in this reso- 
lution. We may well hope, therefore, to find in the life of the college indi- 
cations of the best qualities which animated the founder — strength of his 
strength, life of his life, — such hardihood, such integrity, such self-control, 
such clearness of vision, as are essential to the successful prosecution of any 
good enterprise. 

The directions contained in the will of John Simmons necessitated a 
board of trustees who should for the time being administer the property. 

40 



W$t fflitvota&m 



Here again must be brought to the support of the new institution the char- 
acter and experience of men who had been trained in business affairs, who 
were accustomed to administering large interests, and who were ready to 
place their time and their abilities at the disposal of the new institution. 
The will of Mr. Simmons had called this institution into being and already 
had gathered about it strength, ability and skill. 

When the time came for the incorporation of the college the act of 
incorporation in its first sentence enumerates the members of the first 
corporation of the college: "Joseph Sawyer, Henry G. Nichols, Fanny B. 
Ames, Edward H. Bradford, Heman M. Burr, Augustus Hemenway, Marian 
C. Jackson, Frances R. Morse, Edgar H. Nichols, William T. Sedgwick, and 
Joseph B. Warner, their associates and successors." To those who have 
been associated with this group the Act of Incorporation seems a very 
human document. By what lodestone were this group gathered together? 
Out of busy lives, already carrying heavy responsibilities, accustomed to 
public service, finely trained, admirably equipped, and wholly devoted, 
they gave themselves to study and to execution in behalf of the new insti- 
tution. It would be an interesting volume which would reveal the many 
conferences, the frequent allusions, the hours of thought, the continuous 
correspondence, the meeting after meeting, which gradually crystallized 
the thought concerning the new college, enlisted public opinion, and paved 
the way for the new work. It was a human undertaking. The strength, 
the interest, the personality, the individual tastes and preferences of each 
expressed themselves in all these ways and became in very truth threads of 
the new web which all together were weaving. So to the lives of the founder 
and the first board of trustees were added the rich experiences of this notable 
group of men and women who with their "associates and successors" were 
constituted a body corporate by the name of Simmons Female College. 

For what purpose? It would be well if each and every student were 
to turn to page 17 of the catalog of 1911-12 and read once again the pur- 
poses and responsibilities of this corporation — "to furnish instruction and 
training" and "to receive, hold, and manage for that object property and 
funds; and generally to conduct the affairs of the college." 

Not stone, bricks and mortar, then, the foundation of the college, but 
human lives and human interests, the devotion of loyal men and women, 
pledged to the service of humanity. This is a very real and very genuine 
service, given absolutely without compensation and without stint. Every 
girl who comes and goes in the daily life of the college is, whether she knows 
it or not, touching hands with those workers who have poured into the life 
of the college the precious treasure with which their own lives were endowed. 

Next and naturally comes the list which appears in the catalog under 
the title "Officers of Instruction and Administration." I sometimes wish 



41 



Qtfje jlfflttrocojsm 



that the students who come and go, breaking intellectual bread in the class- 
room according to schedule, and whisking from one recitation to another, 
measuring so many points of this subject and so many others of that, com- 
menting in passing upon the length of this lesson or the peculiarity of that, 
might know as some of us know, all the human qualities that abide in the 
body known as the "Officers of Administration and Instruction." The 
penalty of becoming a part of any institution is a certain formalizing which 
tends to make us forget the personal and human experiences behind the 
organization. One of the privileges of the dean's office is frequent confer- 
ence with one or another member of the staff who comes to discuss college 
problems as they concern individuals. Here it's not the professor, the in- 
structor, or the assistant who speaks, but the human friend. Often a brief 
message stating that a student is working too hard, or a note telling of the 
personal sorrow which has befallen another, — the loss of friend or home; 
sometimes the suggestion that the well-intentioned schedule bears hard upon 
certain individuals; again a petition for help for the student who has un- 
wittingly revealed to the instructor a need more urgent than that which 
could be met by the department of science or an instructor in literature'; 
there are very real indications of a friend's interest. 

Even the Faculty meetings, much questioned, and sometimes exalted 
in limericks or other would-be verse, express a constant and abiding con- 
cern for the genuine interests of the human lives confided to the care of the 
college. So much better each would do if he might! So much more we 
long to do than we can! Yet no more earnest, no more devoted service 
can be found anywhere than that which is given without limit in the service 
of our college youth. The tie which binds us all together is the common 
desire for a larger knowledge and a larger life, and behind all the courses of 
instruction is the common human aspiration and the common human 
interest. 

So far, then, the story of the college has been a story of human life; 
yet that life centers, not in the founder, not in the corporation, not in the 
officers of instruction and administration, but in the tide of youth that since 
the college door first opened has poured across the threshold. When it 
began we know; when it shall end, who can tell? 

When we were children we watched with gradually growing interest 
the crinkly line on a pink and blue map, which we were told stood for a big 
river, the Mississippi, perhaps. Here, at a certain spot it started, wavered 
a bit, chose this slope rather than that, and meandered down toward the 
lowland. You and I saw at first nothing but a wavy, tremulous, black line, 
ending in the green area which we called the Gulf of Mexico. Later we 
came to understand something of the beginning of the brooks that gathered 
themselves together to form the mighty river, something of the service 



42 



£fce ftttcrocoam 



which the great river performed as it rolled past the miles upon miles of 
bluffs and banks on its way to the ocean. Gradually, too, we came to 
understand how vast was the area which it drained and how immense the 
interests which it conserved. Yet even now we hardly realize how tremen- 
dous is its force and how immeasurable its gift, and that its duration is 
probably without end. For whatever may be true of the water drop that 
makes its journey from ftasca to the Gulf of Mexico, the river goes on 
forever. 

So with the institution. Our first notion of the college life was very 
much like our first conception of the river system. As we grow in knowledge 
and attain a clearer understanding we come to see how life after life pours 
itself into the institution, just as brook after brook adds its gift to the river. 
The lives may be forgotten; the college (like the river) endures, and moves 
on. 

What is it all for? For the sake of this tide of life that pours through 
the college doors. Group after group, class after class, day after day, year 
after year — it comes; for what? Why did you come? What did you 
expect to find? What have you found? What does the college mean to 
you? If some seer skilled in divination were thus to challenge every 
student who passes over the college threshold, and if each one were able to 
reply with complete understanding and absolute sincerity, then we should 
all know. For the quest would reveal the heart of the seeker, varying with 
the various conceptions of life — yes, with the misconceptions; it would 
reveal as well the college waiting with its gifts, while the ardent disciple 
grasps perhaps the "few herbs and apples," unheeding the proffer of "bread, 
kingdoms, stars, and sky that holds them all." 

The college is a growing-place. Here youth meets youth and youth 
meets maturity and age. The truth-seeker shares the vision and the under- 
standing of the one who, having traveled longer and climbed higher, has 
seen farther than the rest. Lessons are chosen, instruction is given; but 
it means all the while that the young heart asks for knowledge, for help, for 
inspiration, and the larger and fuller life gives itself in the service of the 
learner, the student. 

Very friendly and very real are the relations which students establish 
with each other, bringing thus the way from the home with its close com- 
panionship to the world with its other and manifold relations. The light 
upon life which comes from the revelations of such comradeship is not to be 
undervalued. Nay, it may exceed in value the instruction of the classroom. 
But it is not necessary for us to choose one and forego the other. The col- 
lege opportunity is at its best when each thrives to the utmost. 

What the college may mean in friendship and comradeship these para- 
graphs need not state. The answer is written clearly in every individual 

43 



Gflfje iffltcrocosm 



experience. It is a precious revelation. What the college aims to be in its 
other relations is perhaps too dimly understood as we march from lesson to 
lesson, from subject to subject, in our pursuit of the degree. Over and over 
again the graduate, coming back, says, as she enters the familiar class- 
room or grasps the hand of some instructor, "Oh, I am beginning to under- 
stand what the college meant!" This will ever be true. The college is 
striving honestly to fulfill the trust imposed upon it by the founder. It 
must "prepare for self-maintenance" in character, in ability, in technique, 
the young women who are going out to their various tasks in the world. 
Such training, such habits, such ideas, as will serve best these young workers 
when they confront their tasks in life — these the college must incorporate. 
At best we must speak of tasks which are remote and in a language which 
can be translated only by means of the task. Thus, many of the principles 
so earnestly promulgated are to the student but prophecies, but those who 
have given their earnest endeavors to the life of the college feel assured that 
in the years to come the task in itself will interpret the teaching and will 
prove the integrity of the college purpose. 

What, then, shall be the spirit of this college? The spirit of comrade- 
ship, since we are all bound together in a common endeavor; the spirit of 
service, for we are gathered together in the interests of the tasks which are 
awaiting us all and which we must loyally and honestly face, prepared at 
our best to fulfill them at our best; the spirit of sympathy for all workers 
everywhere, for we are assembled in the interests of doing as well as of being 
and must be "not simply good, but good for something"; the spirit of 
loyalty to all the traditions which make for professional honor and generous 
service. "They helped every one his neighbor, and every man said to his 
brother, 'Be of good courage.'" 

This institution, then, is a living thing — its life reaching far back into 
the past and far forward into the future, — beyond any one of the individuals 
who befriend and support it, — better than any or all of us, yet dependent 
upon each and every one of us. And hence our pledge, which we repeat 
as we sing: 

"Fair shall thy name be trusted to our care, 
For thy dear sake our lives shall be more fair." 



44 




nimiE 




LOIS LINCOLN MARTIN PRISCILLA HAM 

(Elisabeth Hyde, 1911) (Jennie Dunmore, 1907) 

STELLA and LEBARON KARSON 

(Susan Dickerman, 1906) 

CHARLES WILLETT SPOONER HENRY HOVEY KIRKPATRICK 

(Emily Clark, 1908) (Grace Hovey, 1907) 



Alumnae &££octatton 



OFFICERS 

Martha Wentworth Suffren, President 

68 Buckingham Rd., Brooklyn 

Margery Boylston, Vice-President 

108 Central Ave., Milton 

Eva Whiting White, Secretary 

40 Wenonah St., Roxbury 

Theodora Kimball, Treasurer 

107 Greenbrier St., Dorchester 



Jessie Moor 



Louise Andrews 



Gladys E. Litchfiel 



Brookline. Mass 



Southbridge, Ma 



Marion Burrage, Recording Secretary 

Cambridge, Mass. 



Six years ago our first class was graduated; ten years ago this fall the 
college first opened its doors. Not so long a record but that we can look 
back and consider the progress made. 

In June each year the Alumna? come together to start a new year, 
to consider whether they have made progress, and to plan for the coming 
twelvemonth. And always there arises the thought, "If we were older, if 
our numbers were greater, how much more could be done." The graduates 
who, each year, become members in the Association, bring to it far more 
than they know; they bring to it a new strength, a new realization of the 
actual conditions, and needs, — and possibilities. The Alumnae welcome 
them. If, however, the Association could go one step further, and enlist 
the interest and co-operation of the girls still in college, so that the two 
groups would be working together, progress might indeed be made, and 
made rapidly. To get at the actual needs of the undergraduates, to help 
to bear their burdens, and to shape the policy of the college toward them, 
that is the work which the Alumnse should actually do, and which they can 
only bring about by the establishment of a close and frank relationship 
with the students who are still enrolled. 



Martha Wextworth Scffrex. 



47 



1912 CLASS SONG 



r^ J J i 1 - J ' j i j. ,rJ ' u -j ;ij j j .' \-tir-* i i 



Class-niates,Iet us raise to-$eth-er Our cjladsonj to- day For The class we all so ho 
FVitnd-shipsthattimeneer-can sev-er In tins class weve made, And fur all life's stern < 




Andhercolors clay Faith -ful, loy-al. let us ever- Stn« her pride to be. And from 

Firm foundation bid Not with words a- lone devotion We shall show to thee, But by 




uc)htthatm,cihrdiScVace her. May we all be fr 

very deed and rno- tion Triroucjh the years to be 



Nine-teen twelve well raise tVie cho-r 




Make the echo nncj ! Hearl and voicei-like u-ni- tin$ We Ihy prais-es sine). 




IRC 

ARK 
THE 





SENIORS 



ClaS* of 1912 




Officers 

Hazel M. Turner 
President 



Harriet M. Bosworth 
Vice-President 



Mildred J. Taylor 
Secretary 



H. Julia Pitman 
Treasurer 



1912 ^tereopttcon 



It is with great pleasure that I come before you this evening some- 
what in the capacity of an historian, but more as an interested friend, who 
wishes to recall to his audience one by one the never-to-be-forgotten events 
of the past four years. Nothing is so gratifying to a speaker as to feel 
that he is one with his audience. I have been fortunate enough to obtain 
for this occasion a wonderfully comprehensive collection of views embracing 
the life of the Class of 1912 from the time she began to think and ponder on 
the mighty question of properly bestowing her mighty intellect for the next 
four years, to the time when she looked back upon the period as one of the 
happiest in her life. 

(Applause.) 

We have in our first picture a large, impressionistic sketch of the arrival 
of the girls — big girls, tall girls, short girls — having just one thing in 
common, their membership of 1912. We might throw upon the screen, 
in fine print, the myriads of events that filled the next few weeks, but they 
would but deal with Freshman trials and tribulations, with difficulties met 
and conquered, with work well done. 

Now we have a picture gay with bright colors, the first Christmas 
vacation. Who can forget it? We have looked forward to no succeeding 
one as we did to it. 

Ah! A circus! It speaks for itself — just notice, however, the 
wonderful intelligence the elephant is showing. 

(Laughter and applause.) 

Next, a charcoal sketch of our first mid-years', a dismal scene reminding 
one of some of Dickens's gruesome scenes, rain, brain-fag, deluge, slaughter, 
etc. 

It is slowly disappearing and yielding its place to the daintily pic- 
tured scene of the parties which followed, practically a kind of initiation of 
1912 by her upper-class sisters. The happy faces of the Freshmen bear 
tribute to the success of the entertainments and impress any who look 
upon them with the deep and genuine gratitude that 1912 had for the 
entertainers. 

One more scene, an exuberant crowd of girls grouped on the courts 
around a central figure, with a huge bunch of daisies in her arms. 1912's 
first tennis championship, and she justly rejoices. 



The picture of her arrival in college in the fall of 1909 is not indistinct 
52 



West iHtcrotosm 



or composite like the first of this series, but clear cut and fine with detail. 
Notice here and there the groups of friends and their ecstatic greetings. 

I have been less successful in gathering views of this Sophomore year, 
but that must not be thought indicative of a year of " all work and no play." 
If one could but read the record in the annals of the class, she would in part 
appreciate the judicious mixture of the bitter with the sweet, for 1912 never 
"allowed her studies to interfere with her regular college course." 

Of course she entertained the Freshmen, and originally, as this next 
picture indicates. It was being able to look forward to such an opportunity 
that helped her to swallow her own Freshmanhood. 

But what is this breaking in so luridly upon our quiet good time? 
Bags, boxes, bundles, — a hurry and flurry, — girls wrapped in scarlet 
blankets, weeping mock tears, burlesquing a tragedy. Scarlet fever has 
afforded an unexpected vacation, and all but eleven unfortunates can impose 
themselves upon their respective families for a short time. 

Ah! This blank curtain indicates that I have failed to find a suitable 
representation, this time of necessity. A yellow and white luncheon, and a 
party for the exalted seniors were intended to come here, and this blank 
curtain stands as a memorial of what we tried to do but could not. 

A few moments' intermission and we continue on our pictorial history, 
this time of the Junior year, held by many to be the most to be remembered. 

The first is a dainty scene in South Hall, with its dominant tones of 
gold and white, a tea in honor of the new president and the first time since 
the Freshman Frolic that 1912 has been alone. 

A series of black and white follow, showing our preparations for Prom; 
parties in Students' Room, and sales of all descriptions. Everyone is 
helping royally, some with a memory of their own good times, some with an 
eye to the future. 

A dark square sprinkled with starry lights and a long procession of 
Jack o'Lanterns — the Senior Serenade. Of the companion piece to this, 
I am fortunate to be the sole possessor. Observe that group of grotesque 
figures illuminated by a single torch; sh! — an instant's blaze, — the secret 
Junior rites are over. Did anyone ever know what happened? 

And now the Prom itself. First South Hall drawing room thronged 
with black coats, piloted by the dainty Sophomore ushers; the refectory 
brilliant with lights and flowers and pretty gowns; North Hall, with its 
tables attractively laid for supper; and finally the yard lighted by Japanese 
lanterns and filled with interested spectators. 

As a final achievement, here are views of the S. A. A. taken in its 
infancy; a portrait of its first officers; pictures of its first track meet with 
triumphs for 1912 in track events and tennis. 

S3 



Wyt jffltcrocosm 



A written record of 1912's Senior year would show more work and less 
play, still scarcely a page could be turned without catching a glint of gold 
letters. 

A tea also introduces this year, but its tone is more "homey" and every- 
one knows everybody else. 

Next, a gray etching, a reproduction of the rainy day which was to have 
seen 1912's fourth triumph at tennis, a few faithful, enthusiastic souls are 
stepping gingerly on the court to see if there is the slightest hope for play. 
The bunting and flags look sadly bedraggled. 

Here 1912 is making the class of little Freshmen happy for the one last 
time at Simmons. Do not infer from that that they were happy for the 
last time, though the inference would be but natural, — but why not make 
a jest of an event so prone to sadden a Senior class. 

Here is a dignified stately procession of Seniors marching at chapel. 
How solemn they are in spite of the peculiar and frantic endeavors of a man 
at the door to keep them in step as they pass him. 

Informal teas in North Hall to "know each other." 

Our last track meet; the membership has grown since last we saw a 
similar scene, and the thought of what the future will bring is pleasant. 

And now Commencement week and its festivities sprinkled with a 
solemnity that must necessarily be present: Baccalaureate service, the 
Monday dance, Class Day on the "quad," the Glee Club Concert, Com- 
mencement itself, 1912's first dinner as alumnse of Simmons College, and 
finally her farewell luncheon with those "guilty" running around the table 
amid the exclamations of congratulation and surprise. 

Would that we might throw upon the screen prospect pictures of ten 
years hence; the class babies, suffragettes; the teachers, presidents, doc- 
tors, chemists that are to make the world recognize them; the magnificent 
brownstone buildings all along the Fenway; the campus, where once we 
maligned the dump; the escalators and rest rooms; a quiet, wonderfully 
equipped library, and so on. 

(Signs of incredulity in audience, but evident approval of the idea 
suggested by the fragments of half-spoken sentences.) 

Oh, yes, these will all materialize if we wait. And let it never be said 
that 1912 was called upon in vain. 



54 



W$t jWicrocosm 



<$-JU §. 9^< 



Compton, New Hampshire 

Preparatory School, Plymouth High School 

Class President (3) 

Class Basketball Team (2) (3) 

Vice-President Student Guild (3) 




^^t^t^ttTZ^LA^T^ 



10 Kent Avenue, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 
Pittsfield High School 




GvuAol e. CLU«AjL 



54 South Street, Concord, New Hampshi 
Concord^High School 
Class Vice-President (1) 
Microcosm^Board (2) (4) 
President of S. A. A. (3) (4) 
Class Basketball Team (2) (3) (4) 
Class Track Team' (3) 




55 



Wf)t ^Microcosm 




n. <m~ 



325 Grant Avenue, Richmond Hill, New York 
Richmond Hill High School 




■Vurta. I d^ 



oUa^&vx^. 



256 North State Street, Concord, New Hampsh 

Concord High School 

Treasurer of Class (2) (3) 

Secretary of Student Government (3) 

President of Student Government (4) 

Vice-President of the Guild (4) 




^limr^u. It. tZal-co-ok 



102 Crawford Street, Roxbury, Massachi 
Girls' High School, Boston 
Member of Glee Club (1) (2) (3) 
Member of Choir (2) (3) (4) 



56 



QTJje fflitvoto&m 



£HaJlA. C^)CL^L^~ 



27 Bartlett Avenue, Arlington, Massachusett 
Arlington High School 
Microcosm Board (4) 




Tjll, 



-c v 



c^uj e rBt^jK^ 



Pittsford, New York 
Pittsford High School 
Business Manager Microcosm (1912) 




>fiW^^ 



118 Cornell Street, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Springfield Central High School 
Secretary of Class 1912 (2) (3) 
Vice-President of 1912 (4) 




57 



Efje jftlicrocosm 




irtjLou^ctf 03* 



71 Fayette Street, East Lynn, Massachusetts 
Lynn English High School, Lynn, Massachusetts 




V_ cxmsLrinnxxj ) t) e-uoJLh_^> 



Uc 



5 West Street, Montpelier, Vermc 
Montpelier High School 
Chairman Flower Committee (4) 




-o^L^ <^_. °a^\* 



Bradford, Massachusetts 
Haverhill High School 



58 



QCfjc jffltcrocojsm 



QIcl. PSicudt^ 



169 Main Street, Bradford, Massachusetts 
Brookline High School 



Jj&lMMt (r, Cli4VL,iW~ 



26 Eighteenth Street, Lowell, Ma 
Lowell High School 
Junior Ways and Means Committ 
Treasurer of Student Guild 

Senior Prom. Committee 




CJulu. Cj. C<rrw>eA_^_ 



West Brookfield, Massachusetts 

Warren High School 

Glee Club (1) (2) (3) (4) 

Choir (2) (3) 

Guild President (4) 

Vice-President Student Government (4) 




59 



&fje jftlierocofim 




y^OLxJUsuxj^uLL 



Care of Mrs. Walter Nichol, Dundas, Ontario, Canada 
Conneaut High School (Ohio) 
Bradford Academy 




M^yv[.JLuiu 



240 Main Street, Spencer, Massachusetts 
David Prouty High School 




C R~k'H C^t*^ 



^ 



167 Summer Street, Arlington, Massachusetts 
Arlington High School 



60 



tEfie fflicrocosm 



(jsywJL, Ql ■ U^ 



Edmeston, New York 
Oneonta Xormal 




cIaj~cu-x {Ylqjuix) OudZeXf\) 



137 Washington Street, Marblehead, Massacht 
Salem High School 




^<^^ss 



437 East Main Street, Batavia, New York 
Batavia High School 
Honor Committee (2) (4) 
Prom Committee (3) 




GCfie iflicrocosm 




(Ve~~^*- \\. "^-CowoilSl 



437 East Main Street, Batavia, New "fork 
Batavia High School 
Vassar, '09 




^frjcuyoTA-i- &■ ^chj^y 



Main Street, Hingham Center, Massachusetts 
Hingham High School 




iQJL*. 4^~~L 



31 Arlington Street, South Framinghara, Massachusetts 
Framingham Academy and High School 



62 



Zi)t #licrocoism 



ou— a.i. %xJu>~+<^ 



24S Fort Pleasant Avenue, Springfield, Massachusetts 
Central High School, Springfield 
Basketball, 1909-1910 




1f«U& 



*\£^Q<^s\s{^L^<^i^jLA^ 



32 Dedham Avenue, Needham, Massachusetts 
Xeedham High School 




\J\LW>ca/ <J v-^ 



West Baldwin, Maine 
Fr>-eburg Academy 
Student Government Council (4) 
Senior Dance (4) 




63 



®be jfWicrocojSm 




jJ-eJjAA; if MaAAXsa/~ 



270 Chestnut Street, Clinton, Massachusetts 

Clinton High School 

Honor Committee (second year) 




(JUyi^yvu- (?[ uMrtilo—- 



71 Leland Street, Portland, Maine 

Moses Brown School, Providence, Rhode Island 




TTloJuJl- Gl«Ju^n Hfi^oAsLiuiain 



7 Pleasant Street, Framingham, Massachu 
Framingham Academy and High School 



64 



QTfje Jfflicrocoam 



JnAjjuyoAjd 



fLdwaj. 



Woodstock, New Brunswick 

Fredericton (New Brunswick) Normal School 




Mia 



£ 



542 County Street, New Bedford, Massachusetts 

New Bedford High School 

Vice-President, 1912 (2) (3) 

Chairman Sophomore-Freshman Party- Commil 

Chairman Cap and Gown Committee (4) 

Vice-President Guild (3) 

Student Government Council (4) 




~\\L.a^itM, "A,;, 



■^ 



94 Hudson Street, Somerville, Massachu 
Somerville English High School 
Vice-President of Guild, Science School 
Microcosm Board, 1912 




65 



)c jWtcrocosm 




^twOu. OJbuia. &jil. 



The Delphine, East Gloucester, Massacht 
Gloucester High School 
Chairman of Christmas Party, 1910 
Chairman of Program Committee, Guild, 
Chairman of Senior Luncheon 




)<Xx^. ^ 



Go-i^ax_o/^ 



44 Union Avenue, South Framingham, Massachusetts 
Framingham Academy and High School 
Basketball (2) (3) (4) 




lAA^JUAd, "lA^^t^J 



69S Salem Street, South Groveland, Massachusetts 
Groveland_High School 



66 



IE fflittoto&m 



l^uu,c 



IAwimJs, 



White Street, Boston. Massachusetts 
East Boston High School 
Chairman Ways and Means Committee (4) 
Junior Prom. Committee 




Zjy^jJlSU B. "V* 



Lincoln Street, Newport, Rhode Island 

Rogers High School 

Secretary of the Guild (4) 

Fire Chief (3) (4) 

Basketball, Forward (2) (3) (4) 

Captain (2) (3) (4) 

Varsity Team (3) (4) 

Track (3) 




^jCVlt>s\j<X}-J 



Vu>4>^ 



27 Day Avenue, Westfield, Massachusetts 
Westfield High School 
Guild Chapter Head 




67 



Wot JHtcrocogm 




\LaX^JOL^A^^- ^PoaA^o 



218 North East Street, Raleigh, North Carolina 
Meredith College 



f$m 



CJiajTMSn>r>rruL^f 



Bf ^^^^^ 


Clifton, Maine 

Cambridge (Massachusetts) Latin School 


1 ) / LM 








r% 


8iMums I TU-k^l 


Fn 


369 Harvard Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 

Brookline High School 

Ways and Means Committee (4) 



68 



GDfje fflitvatatim 



t 



Ol. \Ja£Z,OU*~. 



23 Oliver Street, Salem, Massachusetts 

Salem High School 

Welcoming Committee (2) 

Basketball (2) 

Chairman Prom. Committee (3) 

Guild Vice-President (3) 

Glee Club (3) 

Class Treasurer (4) 




)biUEL4fc 



43 Fayette Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 

Cambridge Latin School 

Entered Sophomore Class from Radcliffe College Class i 




CcCcLa 



Holderness, New Hampshire 

Lowell High School 

Bulletin-board Committee (4) 

Member of Committee of Student Condu 




69 



W$t jftlicrocojSm 



8 Elm Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 

Miss Harker's School for Girls, Palo Alto, California 




£01Wcl ©jua. 



72 Cohasset Street, Roslindale, Massachusetts 
Girls' High School, Boston, Massachusetts 
Member of Glee Club, 1910 and 1911 
Member of Choir, 1910and 1911 




BARBARA LEUCRETIA REID 

2611 Haste Street, Berkeley, California 
Graduate of University of California, B. L., 19 
Chi Omega Fraternity 



70 



tEi)t Mittocoim 



-Mic 



Lo^xjjtTAk*.'. 



iL 



561 Surf Street, Chicago, Illinois 

Evanston (Illinois) High School 

Mt. Vernon Seminary, Washington, D. C. 

Northwestern University 

Chairman Senior-Faculty Party (4) 




O^yaA^l ^j^-wf 



142 West Main Street, Marlborough, Massacht 
Marlborough High School 




^TZ) V<h™, (tfriL^. 



Falls Church, Virginia 
George Washington Un 




71 



Cfje microcosm 




J ' UTICcsCjz £ hectic 



Grainfield^Kansas 

Lawrence (Kansas) High School 

Kansas University 




! |-«Lta*u. S*. S^wuxfc - 



137 Prospect Avenue, Wollaston, Massachusetts 
Classical High School, Worcester, Massachusetts 




McA*, £. 



•Ijtzja^-b&ysi*; 



Hudson, New Hampshire 

Nashua (New Hampshire) High School 



72 



tEfje fflittoto$m 








501 North Main Street, Athens, Pennsylvania 
Athens High School 








35 Mayflower Street, Plymouth, Massachusetts 
Plymouth High School 








153 Highland Avenue, Clinton, Massachusetts 
Clinton High School 
Third year Student Council 
Fourth year, Class Secretary 





73 



Cfjc dUicrorogm 




\\\(OUfr^uTlL?UXiM_ 



216 Porter Avenue, Warren, Ohi. 
Warren High School 
Middlebury College 




^5 C£-r-rT^<u Jl^rtsnXo-rx/ 



7 Pearl Street, Stoneh, 
Stoneham High Schoc 
Choir, 1909-10 
Glee Club, 1909-10 




yCuwisJtXJ/tyisC- . 



55 Linden Street, Manchester, New Hampshire 

Manchester High School 

President (2) 

Glee Club (2) 

Basketball (2) (3) (4) 

Track (3) (4) 

Welcoming Committee (4) 

Editor-in-Chief Microcosm (4) 



74 



QTflc iHicrotosm 



nfM 



,JUJvU£A^ 



South Lancaster, Massachusetts 
Three years at Lancaster High School 
One year at Clinton High School 
Treasurer of Class. Freshman Year 
President of Senior Class 
Member of Honor Committee in 191 1 



TY\ 



""3 



^\ UH^*c<rwJ^. 



264 Center Street, Newton, Massachusetts 
Newton High School 




VJ-jov^j VjXWJto.^ 



"3- 



19 Lewis Avenue, Great Barrington, Massachusetts 
Searles High School, Great Barrington 




75 



W$t Microcosm 




U/uixn LHLj 






Adams Street, Milton, Massachusetts 

Milton Academy, Milton, Massachusetts 

Class President (1) 

Music Committee (2) (3) (4) 

Interclass Tennis Champion (2) (3) (4) 

Chairman Tennis Committee (4) 

Class Basketball Team (2) (3) (4) 

Varsity Basketball (3) (4) 

Class Track Team (3) 

Chairman Program Committee (3) 

Chairman Class Day Committee (4) 




^jjjuikiSkXOcrtr^ 



37 Harvard Street, Brookline, Massa 
Boston Girls' Latin School 
Junior Ways and Means Committee 
Microcosm Board, 1912 
Class Day Committee 




Ejuu. a u^ 



13 Linden Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 
Cambridge High School and Cambridge Latin School 
Member Glee Club, 1908-09 
Member Mandolin Club, 1908-09 



76 



>-3n jWemortam 



LUCY M. FRITCH 



CLASS OF 1912 




JMIIIIIS 



Class; of 1913 




Officers 

Helen Boehmki 
President 



Martha M. Libbey 
Vice-President 



Margaret Niles 
Secretary 



Mary Dutton 
Treasurer 



80 



Cfje fflittoto&m 



€ias& of 1913 



Name 
AGATE, HELEN G. 
ALMY, HELEN 
BABCOCK, CATHERINE W. 
BABCOCK, CLARISSA G. 
BAKER, F. JOSEPHINE 
BLAKE. DOROTHY 
BLAKEY, LETITIA 
BOUGHTON, HELEN E. 
BROWN', SUSAN K. 
BURKE, JEANNETTE 
BURNHAM, ELEANOR 
BUTTRICK, ALICE M. 
CASHMAN, RITA 
CHAMBERLIN, MARY E. 
CHAPIN, ESTHER S. 
CLARKE, MAZELLE L. 
CURRY, MARCELLA C. 
DAWES, RHODA 
DAY, ELIZABETH H. 
DIALL, OLIVE E. 
DONALDSON. MARION S. 
DOUGLAS, WINIFRED 
DUTTON, MARY C. 
ESSICK, INEZ H. 
FOWLE, J. EDNA 
FREDERICK, KATHERINE M. 
FREEMAN, AMY F. 
GALLAGHER, ALICE R. 
GODDARD. MARJORIE A. 
GOLDSMITH. A. FLORENCE 
GURDY. MARIE W. 
HALL, FLORA E. 
HAMLIN, HELEN B. 
HARWOOD, ANNIE E. 
HATHAWAY, MARY 
HENDERSON, MARIE E. 
HINCHUFF, JEANNETTE B. 
HOLDEN, KATHRYN 
HUELSTER, FRANCES 
HUGH ITT, DOROTHY 
IRWIN, HAZEL A. 
JOHNSTON, LAURA E. 
"KEELER, MARION 
KELLAWAY, ELSIE M. 
KFMMERER, LUCY C. 
KNEIL, MARGARET M. 
LEONARD, AMY 
LOCKE, LOUISE 
McDUFF, BLANCHE G. 
McGURK, K. LOUISE 
McINTYRE, HELEN C. 
MANDELSTAM, GERTRUDE 
MARCO. HELENA 
MURPHY, KATHERINE M. 
NEWMAN, LORETTO C. 
NILES, MARGARET H. 
PACKARD, SARAH A. 
PARKER, MARGARET L. 
PARMENTER, ABBY H. 



Home 

Pittsford, N. Y. 

New Bedford 

JerseyCity,N.J. 

Norwood 

Brookline 

Woburn 

Pleasanton, Kan. 

Valley Falls, N. Y. 

Luverne, Minn. 

Three Rivers, Mich. 

Needham 

Arlington 

Newbury port 

Manchester. N. H. 

Worcester 

Fall River 

Lynn 

Bozeman, Mont. 

Bellows Falls, Vt. 

Chelmsford 

Fairfield, Conn. 

St. Louis, Mo. 

East Craftsbury, Vt. 

Des Moines, la. 

Woburn 

Methuen 

Milton, N. S. 



Wallingford, Conn. 

Boston 

Rockland, Me. 

Boston 

Gorham, N. H. 

Athol 

Newport, R. I. 

Framingham 

Rockford, 111. 

Boston 

Michigan City, Ind. 

Auburn, N. Y. 

Aver 

Milford 

Boston 

Newton 

State College, Pa. 

atoga Springs, N. Y. 

Stoughton 

Sturbridge 

Newton 

Maiden 

Brockton 

Boston 

Augusta, Me. 

Boston 

St. Paul, Minn. 

Newark, N. J. 

Tisbury 

Boston 

Attleborough 



GPfje microcosm 



Name 
PARSONS, EDITH N. 
PECK, LILLIE M. 
PETTINGILL, MABEL D. 
PINKS, VERA L. 
PLATTS, ELIZABETH F. 
PORTER, ANNABEL 
RINE, ROSINA E. 
ROSE, ELLA J. 
ST. CLAIR, SADIE 
SAMPSON, ANNIE H. 
SCHLOSS. |L"NE R. 
SCOTT, MARY S. 
SHEPARD, HANNAH B. 
SIPPELL, CLARA M. 
SMITH, HELEN P. 
SPEAR, MABEL A. 
STARRETT, MILDRED H. 
STEARNS, ESTELLE 
STKVENS, JULIA F. 
SWANBURG, NELLIE B. 
SYMONDS, ESTHER M. 
THOMPSON, GRACE M. 
THURSTON, ELIZABETH 
TUTTLE, DOROTHY M. 
TYACKE, DOROTHY 
WALKER, ELIZABETH AI. 
WEED, H. IRENE 
WELLS, EDNA A. 
WILBER, DORIS E. 
WILLIAMS, MARION S. 
WOOD, DORA 
WOODWARD, EAIILY E. 



Home 

Thompsonville, Conn. 

Gloversville, N. Y. 

Winchester 

Meriden, Conn. 

Holbrook 

Gloucester 

Coldwell, N. J. 

Providence, R. I. 

Newport, R. I. 

Plymouth 

Berkeley, Cal. 

Belmont 

Brookline 

Boonville, N. Y. 

Somerville 

Boston 

Athol 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Aliddletown, N. Y. 

Shelburne, N. S. 

Swampscott 

Townsend 

Melrose 

Manchester, N. H. 

Boston 

Worcester 

Lowell 

London, Conn. 

Medford 

Boston 

Exeter, N. H. 

Framingham 



Ne 



S2 




SDPHDMDRES 



Cla£$ of 1914 




Officers 





Ruth Whiting 






President 




Constance Ekstrand 




Anita Clark 


Vice-President 


Marion Andrews 
Treasurer 


Secretary 



85 



tEi)t JWtcrocosm 



Class; of 1914 



Name 
ABBOTT, GLADYS L. 
ALLEN, NORMA 
ANDERSON, HELEN M. 
ANDREWS, MARION 
ASHENDEN. CONSTANCE 
ASHLEY, ROSAMUND W. 
ATKINS, HELEN G. 
ATKINSON, MILDRED 
ATWOOD, HORTENSE F. 
AYER, DORIS L. 
BAILEY, MARTHA P. 
BAKER, GERTRUDE F. 
BARTO, MARJORY I. 
BASSETT, AVA S. 
BASSETT, INEZ E. 
BEACH, DOROTHEA 
BEETLE, CLARA 
BELL, DOROTHY 
BELL, LUCY S. 
BIGELOW, DOROTHY 
BOEHMKE, HELENE A. 
BRAY, FLORENCE A. 
BROWN, EDITH 
BROWN, LYDIA G. 
BUTTERFIELD, CATHERINE 
CANNON, ELSIE P. 
CARLETON, HELEN F. 
CARPENTER, JEANNETTE R. 
CASNEAU, PEARL E. 
CATE, MILDRED R. 
CLARKE. ANITA Q. 
COLTON, OLIVE 
COMBE. HILDA A. 
CRAWFORD, CORA A. 
CROSBY, HELEN E. 
CROWELL, JENNIE 
DAVIS, ANNA E. 
DAVIS, ANNA T- 
DAVIS, IDA M. 
DA VOL, DOROTHY M. 
DILMAN, MABEL A. 
DOHERTY, MARY A. 
DOYLE, AGNES T. 
DUNNING, FRANCIS M. 
DWYER, FRANCIS T. 
EKSTRAM). CONSTANCE G. 
ELA, ELIZABETH P. 
ELLIS, ELIZABETH B. 
ELLIS, MYRTLE V. 
ESSERS, CLARA 
FARNHAM, HELEN M. 
FOLLWELL, VIOLET G. 
FORD, GERTRUDE 
GALLANT, FLORENCE 
GARTLAND, AGNES C. 
GASPEY, ETTA M. 
GIROUN. MARIE M. 
GORE, DOROTHY R. 
GRANTHAM, FAYE B. 



Home 

Franklin 

Walpole 

La Crosse, Wis. 

Holliston 

Newton 

New Bedford 

Quincv 

Melrose 

Natick 

Plymouth. N. H. 

E. Montpelier, Vt. 

Quincy 

Waterbury, Conn. 

Taunton 

Taunton 

Bangor, Me. 

New Bedford 

Rochester, N. Y. 

Beverly 

Norwood 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Pawtucket, R. I. 

Grafton 

New Bedford 

New York, N. Y. 

Granbv, Conn. 

Haverhill 

Mansfield, Ohio 

Boston 

Salem 

Hartford. Conn. 

Fairlee, Vt. 

Edgewood, R. I. 

Boston 

Arlington 

Petersham 

High Falls, N. Y. 

Boston 

Marietta, Ohio 

Somerville 

Geneva. N. Y. 

Scituate 

Boston 

Bangor, Me. 

Boston 

Boonton, N. J. 

Cambridge 

Worcester 

Cambridge 

Weehawken, N. J. 

Dover, N. H. 

Pittsfield 

Duxbury 

Exeter, N. H. 

Boston 

Melrose 

Albion, N. Y. 

Newton 

Wilmington, .Ohio 



W$t Mitrocoim 



Name 

greene, marian w. 
hale, hazel 
hallgreen, ruth g. 
hanson, mabel l. 
hardy, louisa h. 
hatch, agnes v. 
hitchcock, celia e. 
hughitt, francis s. 
huntington, katharine m. 
johnson, florence p. 
jones. marion d. 
kimball, gladys a. 
klein, ruth b. 
lane, frances o. 
laurin, nina 
lawrence, lillian m. 
libbey, martha j. 
libby, norma l. 
livingston, carolyn 
longfellow, jean 
luce, helen l. 
McCarthy, mary a. 

MacKAY, HELEN G. 
McKENNA, ADELAIDE S. 
McRORY, MARY B. 
MAHANEY, GERTRUDE E. 
MARRINAN, MARY M. 
MARTIN, MARJORIE H. 
MILLER, RUTH S. 
MILLS, ELSIE C. 
MOORE, ANNIE M. 
MORGAN, EVELYN C. 
MUELLER, PAULA F. 
MURPHY, ELSIE R. 
NASH, MARY 
NEIDE, GLADYS B. 
NICKERSON, BERTHA 
NISBET, LILLIAN F. 
NORMAN. RUTH E. 
OSTRANDER, MARION Y. 
PAGE, MARGARET E. 
PAGE, MILDRED W. 
PARKER, RUTH H. 
PARMLEY, MARJORIE 
PECKHAM, RUTH E. 
PELLMAN, JEANNETTE E. 
PERRY, EDNA E. 
PERRY, JOSEPHINE C. 
PIERCE, IRMA J. 
POORE, EMMA F. 
POORE, MARGUERITE 
POTTER, MARGARET A. 
RANDALL, IONA M. 
RAYMOND, LELIA 
REID, CHARLOTTE E. 
RICHARDSON, EDITH F. 
ROBBINS, ESTHER M. 
ROGERS, HARRIET E. 
ROUNDY, RUTH A. 
RUSSELL, DOROTHY 
SACKETT, REBECCA S. 
SALISBURY, H. EDITH 



Home 

Newport, R. I. 

Portland, Conn. 

Providence, R. I. 

Rockingham, N. H. 

Hollis, N. H. 

Cambridge 

Conesus, N. Y. 

Auburn, N. Y. 

Spuyten Duyvil, N. Y. 

Monson 

Boston 

Lowell 

N a tick 

Boston 

Boston 

Wakefield 

Manchester, N. H. 

Brookline 

Manchester, N. H. 

Lambert Lake, Me. 

Dalton 

Haverhill 

Fall River 

Weston 

Port Henry, N. Y. 

Watertown 

Woburn 

Worcester 

Manchester, N. H. 

Boston 

Boston 

Somerville 

E. Cleveland, Ohio 

Gloucester 

Cherryfield, Me. 

Port Henry, N. Y. 

Somerville 

Rehoboth 

Norwich, Conn. 

Schuylerville, N. Y. 

Franklin 

Haverhill, N. H. 

Northfield, Vt. 

Upper Montclair, N. J. 

Bainbridge, N. Y. 

Buffalo, N. Y. 

Brookline 

Topeka, Kan. 

Gardner 

Medford 

Medford 

Sharon 

Brockton 

Essex 

Newton 

Millis 

Monson 

Boston 

Randolph, Vt. 

Plymouth 

Providence, R. I. 

Schuvlerville, N. Y. 



87 



GPbe fWtcrocogm 



SARGENT, CLARA S. 
SILSBY, MILDRED P. 
SMALL, MARION L. 
SMITH, MARGERY M. 
SMITH, MARJORIE G. 
SPRING, HELEN N. 
STREETER, FLORENCE 
STRICKLAND, EDNA H. 
STROHKCKHR, HELEN A. 
SUTHERLAND, MARGARET 
TAISEY, AGNES L. 
TRAIN, CONSTANCE 
TROW, MADGE F. 
TURNER, M. LILLIAN 
WALKER, BARBARA 
WARREN, KATHERINE 
WASHBURN, MARTHA S. 
WETHERELL. ESTHER L. 
WHIPPLE, LAURA A. 
WHITE, MARIE 
WHITING, RUTH K. 
WHITNEY, SARAH F. 
WOODMAN, ERNA E. 
WOODWARD, GERALDINE M. 



Home 

Boston 

Littleton, N. H. 

Saugus 

Skowhegan, Me. 

Wakefield 

Boston 

Adams 

Hartford, Conn. 

Reading, Pa. 

Brunswick, Me. 

Lowell 

Wellfleet 

Marlborough 

Wellesley 

Fitchburg 

Grafton 

Plymouth 

Quincy 

Malone, N. Y. 

Cookeville, Tenn. 

Gt. Barrington 

Natick 

Franklin 

Worcester 




rncsHMCN 



Class of 1915 




(Officers 



Anne Upham 
President 



Harriet Putnaj 

Vice-President 



Winona Hylaxd 

Secretary 



Hazel Kilbourn 
Treasurer 



"1 



Wqi ifflicrotogm 



Class of 1915 

"We are Abbott and Yager, the beginning and the end, the first and the 
last. Our number is 256, and we have gathered together from far and near." 



Name 
ABBOTT, GLADYS C. 
ADAMS, GERTRUDE E. ■ 
ALDEN, ANNIE L. 
ALDRICH, HELEN C. 
ALLEN, ANITA M. 
ALLEN, GRACE M. 
AMES, HARRIET C. 
ANDERSON, EDITH V. 
ANDREWS, HELEN B. 
AYRES, FLORENCE A. 
BABSON, ALICE E. 
BAKER, DOROTHY N. 
BALTHASAR, MABEL G. 
BANTA, MILDRED H. 
BARKER, RUTH S. 
BATCHELDER, ANNA I. 
BATCHELLER. MARGARET E. 
BATEMAN, RUBY W. 
BEAMISH, GWENDOLYN S. 
BEATTIE, EMILY E. 
BECKLEY, CONSTANCE C. 
BENT, MILDRED M. 
BIGELOW, GLADYS M. 
BIRKS, A. LILAH 
BOARDMAN, MIRIAM H. 
BREHM, GERTRUDE 
BRIGGS. MARGUERITE L. 
BROWN, MILDRED B. 
BROWN, OLIVE 
BUTTERS. MARION 
CAMPBELL, EDITH W. 
CARLING, WINIFRED 
CARTLAND. MARIAN P. 
CARY, HELEN H. 
CASS, ETHEL M. 
CHAFFEE, LILLIAN C. 
CHAFFIN, ISABELLE L. 
CLARK, ELINOR 
CLARKE, MARGARET M. 
CLARKE, DOROTHY M. 
COBURN, C. KATE 
CONNOLLY. MARGARET A. 
COOK. EVELINE B. 
CORNELL. TENNIE H. 
CORWIN. MARJORY 
CROSBIE, R. GLADYS 
CROSS, MARIAN F. 
CUTLER, R. MARION 
DANFORTH, M. ELSIE 
DANIEL, ANNA H. 
DANIELS, ELLEN S. 
DAVIS, FLORENCE J. 
DAVIS, MILDRED A. 
DAVIS, RUTH S. 
DAY, THERESA M. 



Home 

Bridgton, Me. 

Worcester 

Boston 

Boston 

Manchester, N. H. 

Salem 

N. Attleborough 

Hyde Park 

Hudson 

Wilmington, Del. 

Gloucester 

Newport, R. I. 

Hamburg, N. Y. 

Binghamton, N. Y. 

Portland, Me. 

Wilton, N. H. 

Dunkirk, N. Y. 

Boston 

Newton 

Quincy 

Newton 

Lvnn 

St. Albans. Me. 

Brockton 

Marblehead 

Waterloo, N. Y. 

Auburn, Me. 

Groton 

Ogdensburg, N. Y. 

Newton 

Boston 

Oxford 

Saco, Me. 

Lowell 

Peterboro, N. H. 

Somerville 

Worcester 

Schenectady, N. Y. 

Haverhill 

Holden 

Plainfield, Vt. 

Chelsea 

Boston 

Washington. D. C. 

Haverhill 

Boston 

Fitchburg 

Plainfield, Vt. 

Arlington 

London, England 

Fitchburg 

Cambridge 

Alton Bay. N. H. 

Dennison, Tex. 



92 



Wqt fffltcrocosm 



Name 
DELANO, LOUISE I. 
DILLON, PATRICE A. 
DIMICK, MILDRED E. 
D1XEE.X. MARA' I). 
DODGE, CAROLYN F. 
DORING, LAURA L. 
DOWNEY, DOROTHY H. 
DRAKE, EDNA F. 
EATON, RUTH M. 
EDGERLY, BEATRICE J. 
EMERSON, ALTA J. 
EMERSON, EVELYN 
ENGLAND, BLANCHE 
FALL, KATHERINE 
FENNELL, ANNIE R. C. 
FINDLEY, SARAH M. 
FLICKINGER, FLORENCE W. 
ELINN, ELIZABETH R. 
FOWLER, ELIZABETH 
FOWLER, ETHEL K. 
FREEDMAN, LEONA E. 
FREEMAN, ELIZABETH K. F. 
FREEMAN, ESTELLE L. 
FRIZELL, DOROTHY R. 
GATES, NORMA 
GEORGE, HILDA M. 
GERALD, HELEN T. 
GILE. HELEN 
GILL, LUCIA A. 
GILLESPIE, RHEA M. 
GILSON, MILDRED E. 
GORDON, G. GLADYS 
GORDON, KATHYRN T. 
GRANT, PEARL A. 
GREEN, HELEN 
GREENE, GLADYS M. 
GREENE, LYDIA H. 
HALE, CECILIA M. 
HAPGOOD, RUTH M. 
HATCH, RUTH W. 
HAYES, DORIS C. 
HAYWARD, ELEANOR 
HENRY, C. MERNA 
HIGHT, ELSIE D. 
HINDS, HELEN 
HODGES, GRACE A. 
HOGAN, MARGARET L. 
HOLMES, MARGARET F. 
HOOKER, FRIEDA C. 
HUBBARD, ANNA 
HUNT, ESTHER L. 
HYLAND, WINONA C. 
IVES, MARGARET 
JACOBSON, DORA 
JENKINS, FLORENCE L. 
JOHNSON, FLORENCE B. 
JOHNSON, LEANNA F. 
IOHNSTON, EDITH 
JOST, BESSIE L, 
KANE, CHRISTINE T. 
KEEGAN, ELLEN S. 
KENNEDY, MARION E. 



Home 

Boston 

Milford 
St. Paul, Miii!,. 
Easton 
Cambridge- 
Cambridge 
Boston 
Sharon 
Boston 
Farmington, X. H. 
Wellsville, X. Y. 
Brattleboro, Vt. 
Tuscola, III. 
Somersworth, N. H. 
Boston 
Kokomo, Ind. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Boston 
Concord, N. H. 
Maiden 
Chelsea 
Central Falls, R. I. 
Needham 
Boston 
Rumford, Me. 
Thomaston, Me. 
Canton 
Melrose 
Lockport, N. Y. 
N. Tonawanda, N. Y. 
Groton 
W. Newbury 
Milton 
Boston 
Cambridge 
Milton 
Greenfield 
Sherbrooke, P. Q. 
Hartford, Conn. 
Maiden 
Boston 
Walpole, N. H. 
Camden, N. Y. 
Sharon 
Stoneham 
Foxborough 
W. Neu-burr 
Plymouth 
Barre, Yt. 
Boston 
Pueblo, Colo. 
Heene. X. K. 
Hartford, Conn. 
Boston 
Reading 
S. Manchester, Conn. 
Norfolk 
Boston 
Boston 
Spencer 
Cambridge 
Dover. X. II. 



93 



Wbt jtlicrocogm 



KENNISON, ELIZABETH L. 
KILBOURN, HAZEL 
KIMBALL, LUCY F. 
KINGMAN, MIRIAM R. 
KIRK, HAZEL M. 
KLEINSCHMIDT, HELEN 
KNAPP, WINIFRED H. 
LANE, BESSIE M. 
LANE, CONSTANCE 
LARKIN, ELSEY W. 
LAW, DOROTHY P. 
LAWRENCE, C. WINIFRED 
LEE, HELEN A. 
LEFFINGWELL, IRMA M. 
LEONARD, MARION F. 
LEUSSLER, OLIVE B. 
LeVALLEY, SARAH H. 

libby, mildred a. 
light, anna e. 
livingston, alice c. 
logan, lillian a. 
loring, bessie b. 
ludgate, jessie h. 
lurvey, m. pauline 
mccormick, gertrude m. 
Mcdonald, theresa a. 

McMANAMA. ALICE 
MAHAR, ELSIE A. 
MARDEN, KATHERINE 
MASON, NINA A. 
MASSON, ANNIE 
MEADER, PEARL E. 
MERRILL, MILDRED S. 
MINOTT, GLADYS E. 
MIRICK, LYDIA L. 
MOUSSARD, YOLANDE 
MURPHY, JANET S. 
MYERS, LOIS N. 
NEWTON, HARRIET M. 
OBER, HELEN P. 
O'BRIEN, HELENA V. 
O'BRIEN, MARY A. 
PACKER, MARIE L. 
PARKHURST, ANNIE L. 
PATTANGALL, EDITH 
PEIRCE, RUTH B. 
PERCY, S. KATHERINE 
PERKINS, ALICE A. 
PERLEY, L. MARGARET 
PERRY, ELINOR 
PIERCE, LILLIAN M. 
PIKE, LUCILE P. 
PINKHAM, MARY A. 
PINNOCK, LORNA 
PIPPEY, EDITH J. 
PLATTS, RUTH A. 
POLAND, NELLIE G. 
PRATT, MARY G. 
PROUDFOOT, AGNES R. 
PUTNAM. HARRIET 
RANDALL, ELEANOR T. 
RAY, ALICE M. 



Home 

Boston 

Gt. Barrington 

Montague 

Somerville 

Findlay, Ohio 

Johnstown, Pa. 

Newton 

Exeter, N. H. 

Winchester 

Le Roy, N. Y. 

Fort Ann, N. Y. 

Binghamton, N. Y. 

Cambridge, Wis. 

Burlington, Vt. 

Abington 

Boston 

Hope, R. I. 

Concord, N. H. 

S. Coventry, Conn. 

Manchester, N. H. 

Leicester 

Duxbury 

Beaver, Pa. 

Boston 

Boston 

Ludlow, Vt. 

Waltham 

Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Boston 

Pawlet, Vt. 

Lowell 

Lynn 

Leominster 

Gardner 

Worcester 

Alton, 111. 

Boston 

Boonton, N. J. 

Brookline 

Ashland, N. H. 

Framingham 

Boston 

Lock Haven, Pa. 

Fitchburg 

Waterville, Me. 

Somerville 

Galesburg, 111. 

Brookline 

Cambridge, Vt. 

Natick 

Holbrook 

Bristol, N. H. 

Portland, Me. 

Salem 

Gardner 

Holbrook 

Lebanon, N. H. 

Boston 

Boston 

Lansdowne, Pa. 

Hampstead, N.H. 

Nantucket 



94 



Cfje jftlicrocosm 



Name 
RAY, HARRIETTE G. 
REID, F. MARION 
RICHARDSON, MARGARET 
RIDLEY, CONSTANCE J. 
RING, MARTHA D. 
RODLER, HILDA M. 
ROONEY, KATHARINE E. 
RUBY, OLIVE C. 
SCHIEDT, MADELEINE 
SCHUERCH, MARION 
SCHWARTZ, MARGUERITE R. 
SHAW, GERTRUDE A. 
SHAW, IMOGENE G. 
SHAW, MAR|ORIE 
SHEEHAN, JANE 
SHERMAN, "ETHEL M. 
SJMS, MARGARET 
SISSON, CLARA M. 
SMALLEY, MARIE F. 
SMITH, DOROTHY F. 
SMITH, EDNA B. 
SMITH, MYRTLE D. 
SNYDER, MARGARET T. 
SPALDING, HELEN 
SPARROW, CAROLINE D. 
SPENCER, GRACE M. 
SPRAGUE, CAROLINE E. 
SPRAGUE, MARGARET M. 
STEVENS, FANNIE R. 
STEVENS, MABEL C. 
STEVENS, MARGUERITE 
STEVENS, OLGA 
STICKNEY, ESTHER L. 
STINSON, RUTH G. 
STONE, RUTH P. 
STRONGMAN, BESSIE T. 
SWEENEY, MARY S. 
SWIFT, ANNA H. 
TAFT, MARTHA E. 
TAVENDER, OTTILIA K. 
TAYLOR, JANETTE M. 
THOMAS', JULIA E. 
THOMAS, KATHARINE J. 
THOMPSON, LAURA F. 
THROSSELL, DOROTHY 
TINGLEY, LOUISE C. 
TITCOMB, MARION 
TOMPSON, GERTRUDE E. 
TOROSSIAN, CHRISTINA 
TOWNSEND. MARGUERITE 
TRIPLETT, GERTRUDE E. 
TULIS, iMARY E. 
TURNER, A. REBECCA 
UNDERWOOD, MARJORIE T. 
UPHAM. ANNE T. 
\ ARNEY, MILDRED C. 
VORIES, RUTH E. 
WADE, DOROTHY E. 
WAGNER, GLADYS H. 
WARNER, MYRTA C. 
WAVLE, HAZEL H. 
WAVLE, LILLIAN A. 



Home 

La Crosse, Wis. 

Boston 

Cambridge 

Brookline 

Quincy 

Davenport, la. 

Boston 

Oneida, N. Y. 

Lancaster, Pa. 

Boston 

Newton 

Quincy 

Adams 

Belfast, Me. 

Maiden 

Liberty, Me. 

New Haven, Conn. 

Westbrook, Me. 

Dennis 

Watertown 

Nantucket 

Merrimac 

Newton 

Boston 

Boston 

Ware 

Quincy 

Turner, Me. 

Stamford, Conn. 

Chesterville, Me. 

Somerville 

Monhegan, Me. 

Maiden 

Watertown 

Somerville 

Newton 

Lawrence 

Milton 

Gloucester 

Boston 

Maynard 

Gloucester 

Alstead Center, N. H. 

Salisbury, N. Y. 

Cleveland. Ohio 

Boston 

Northampton 

Portland. Me. 

Chelsea 

Ludlow, Vt. 

Bangor. Me. 

Weston 

Reading 

Boston 

Keene, N. H. 

Boston 

Pueblo, Col. 

Stoughton 

Lynn 

Beacon Falls, Conn. 

Berkshire, N. Y. 

Cortland. N. Y. 



95 



W$i ifWicrocosfm 



Name 
WELLINGTON, MARJORIE 
WELLS, KATHARYN W. 
WESCOTT, MILDRED B. 
WETMORE, MARION C. 
WHITCOMB, LOUISE R. 
WHITCOMBE, EMILY Z. 
WHITTIER, DOROTHY J. 
WIGHT, PHYLLIS I. 
WILDE, GLADYS F. 
WILLIAMS, A. BLODWEN 
WILLIAMS, ELIZABETH M. 
WILLIAMS, HILDA C. 
WILSON, ELEANOR 
WOODS, DOROTHEA C. 
YAGER, PAULINE M. 



Home 

Stockljridge 

Leominster 

Rumford, Me. 

Boston 

Holbrook 

Batavia, N. Y. 

Leominster 

Boston 

Littleton 

Albany, N. Y. 

W. Concord, N. H. 

Milford 

Cambridge 

Boston 

Watertown, N. Y. 




96 



Wbe jfflicrocoam 



UnclaSstfteb grtubents 



ADAMS, ELIZABETH W. 
ALBRIGHT, FAY M. 
ALLEY, FRANCES N. 
BAKER. BERTHA H. 
BANFILL, MARGARET A. 
BARSTOW, FLORENCE 
BERRY, MARY M. 
BISHOP, ELIZABETH A. 
BLAKE, ELYERETTA S. 
BLANCHARD. DOROTHEA A. 
BRIERLEY, ANNE C. 
BROCKMAN, LOUISE 
CHURCHILL, GLADYS F. 
CLAPP, GRACE E. 
CRAGIN, ELSIE M. 
DAY, ANNA E. 
DONLAN, ESTHER G. 
DUDLEY, ETHEL W. 
FISK, PAULINE 
FORD, ESTHER B. 
GILLETTE, MARY A. 
GILLETTE. SARAH E. 
GREEN, HELEN L., A.B. 
HAYWARD, OLIYE G. 
HILL. HELEN J. 
HOADLEY, EDITH L. 
HOLLAND. CLARA E. 
HOYEY. MARY E. 
HOWARD. FAYE 
IACKSON, HELEN F. 
JENKINS, MAUDE E. 
KENNEN. VIRGINIA 
LITTLEHALES. ETHEL I. 
LOYEJOY, MARION E. 
MALONE, EVA E. 
MEADOWS, FLORENCE 
MUSSON, MARY E. 
PACKARD, HELEN L. 
PATTEN, LOUISE 
PERRY, MARION L. 
POOLE. FLORENCE M. 
PORTER, NINA M. 
RICKER. HARRIETTE J 
ROBINSON, GEORGIA 
ROSENBLAD, MIA E. 
SCARRY. MARGARET 
SEARS, MILDRED G. 
SHEA, KATHARINE B. 
SHEEHAN, CATHARINE 
SMITH. MATILDA 
SPITTLE, H. LAURETTA 
SPRAGUE. M. ESTELLA 
STILL, MARION E. 
WEEKS. ANNIE L. 
WHITNEY. A. GERTRUDE 
WHITTEMORE, EMMA A. 
WILLIAMS, MAIZIE E. 



Charle 



W Va. 

Havana, Cuba 

Cortland, N. Y. 

Brockton 

Waterville, P. Q. 

Hartford, Conn. 

Salem 

St. Paul, Minn. 

Portland. Me. 

Truro. N. S. 

Strath am, N. H. 

Ottumwa, la. 

Sanbornville. N. H. 

Waterville. Me. 

Lowell 

Everett 

Lowell 

Gardner 

Brattleboro, \"t. 

Newton 

Providence, R. I. 

Providence. R. I. 

Guthrie. Okla. 

Walpole. N. H. 

Odanah. Wis. 

S. Woodstock, Vt. 

Northbridge 

Hartford, Conn. 

Bansor. Me. 

Everett 

Newton 

Worcester 

New Britain, Conn. 

Pepperell 

Villa Rica, Ga. 

Boston 

Gilbertsville. X. Y. 

Portland. Me. 

Newton 

Natick 

Brockton 

New York. N. Y 

Turner, Me. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

Milton 

Dedham 

Brookline 

Manchester 

Maiden 

River Falls, Wis. 

Boston 

TemDleton 

town. N. Y. 

Newton 

Wenham 

Wakefield 

Lexington 



Johi 



97 



GCfje fflittoto&m 



Name 

aldrich, marion l. 
belcher, stella a. 
breed, beulah h. 
bristol, louise f., a.b. 
brown, bernice 
burke, may a. 
carey, marie k. 
carter, caroline l., a.b. 
carver, helen, a.b. 
caton, bertha a. 
chase, sarah g. 
chick, clara m. 
childs, marion a. 
clark, marion w. 
clough, mae b. 
collins, mary f. 
crane, louise e. 
davis, esther k. 
davis, martha h. 
dubuc, agnes t. 
dudley, madge n. 
elliot, rosamond 
everett, mary l. 
fales, ruth s. 
farris. mabel w. 
foley, georgiana w. 
forsythe, nina b. 
foss, lilian f. 
foster, ruth 
franklin, clara, a.b. 
gilbert, minnie 
gorton. caroline s., a.b. 
greenough, margaret c. 
guyette, caroline l. 
harvie, ruth j. 
hatch, elsie 
hawkes, dora m. 
hicks, florence c, a.b. 
hughes, kate m. 
irving, eleanor n. 
iackson, caroline a. 
jones, linn 
joyce, adeline t. 
kean, mary d. 
lacey, gertrude 
lawrence, mary a.b., 
longdyke, grace b. 
lundberg, marie g. 
Mcdowell, ella r. 
neill, nellie j. 
nevers, marion s. 
palmer, marian 
pellegrini, felicita c. 
robinson, margaret 
russell, gertrude, a.b. 
searle, elsie e. 
shaw, helen m. 
sholes, bertha 
simonds, barbara 
smart, cecile c. 
smith, harriet r. 



Home 

Somerville 

Medford 

Boston 

Cambridge 

Parma, Mich. 

Boston 

Boston 

Haverhill 

Cambridge 

Foxborough 

Brookline 

Cambridge 

Barnstable 

Saybrook, Conn. 

Newport, Vt 

Lawrence 

Boston 

Boston 

Weston 

Boston 

Rolla, Mo. 

Keene, N. H. 

Franklin 

Somerville 

Salem 

Boston 

Newton 

Boston 

Boston 

Melrose 

Northampton 

Sherburne, N. Y. 

Maiden 

Cambridge 

Leominster 

Brandon, Vt. 

Melrose 

Arlington 

Newton 

Marlborough 

Medford 

Clinton, la. 

Brookline 

Newton 

Quincy 

Cambridge 

Melrose 

Waltham 

Needham 

Lynn 

Concord, N. H. 

Manchester, N. H. 

Boston 

Hingham 

Winchester 

Methuen 

Boston 

Boston 

Brookline 

La Grange, Me. 

Ravenswood, W. Va. 



Efje ftlicroeosm 



Name Home 

SOUTHER, HELEN D. Boston 

SPANGLER, H. MARY Mercersburg, Pa. 

SPRAGUE, MAUD W. Boston 

STEARNS, MILDRED B. Boston 

STEDMAN, MABEL Brookline 

STODDARD, ELEANOR D. Salem 

STORER, EMILY L. Boston 

STRONG, WILD A C. Cleveland. Ohio 

SULLIVAN, EILEEN Boston 

TERRELL, INEZ J. Waterburv, Conn. 

THOMPSON, ALICE L. Putnam, Conn. 

VAN DER PYL, LAURENA Worcester 

WALKER, LUCY Brookline 

WEBSTER, HARRIET E. Worcester 

WHITE, PAULINE M.. Muskegon, Mich. 

WOODMAN, ANNA C. Cambridge 

WYMAN, ESTHER M, A.B. Arlington 

YANCEY, ELLEN C. Atlanta, Ga. 



99 



Ki}t Mubtnt #utlb 



Since 1907, when Simmons' eligibility to membership in the "Women's 
Intercollegiate Association for Student Government" was established by 
our Student Government Association, we have sent annually two delegates, 
the Guild President and a representative from the Junior Class, to the 
meetings of that organization. 

In November, 1911, the convention was held at Barnard College, New 
York City. Delegates came from many of the larger colleges east of the 
Mississippi, wherever there was a representative student government 
organization, and all contributed largely to the value of the meeting. The 
representatives from each college working out its own individual system of 
student government, according to its own peculiar conditions, gave to the 
other members helpful suggestions which they had gained through experience. 

Besides this more serious side of the meetings, there were, of course, 
social affairs, which Barnard, as hostess, planned for the delegates. The 
convention this year was wonderfully successful in every way. 

The last several years of the college have developed new interests and 
organizations, and with these the former usefulness of the Guild has waned 
and has been superseded to a certain extent by the more recent institu- 
tions. Taking this into consideration, the Guild is now undergoing re- 
vision, to be built up again on a class basis; and with the rapid increase of 
class spirit and enthusiasm, the Guild, by taking this highly recommended 
form of organization, can hardly do otherwise than prove successful. 

Elsie Converse. 



103 



W$t Urtubent #obemment gtestoctatton 



The Student Government Association is practically the same as it was 
last year in its general plan. The officers are, as before, a President from 
the Senior Class; a Vice-President, who is also President of the Student 
Guild; a Secretary from the Junior Class; and a Treasurer from the 
Sophomore Class. These officers, with the house chairmen of the larger 
dormitories, and the proctors of the small houses, comprise the Council, 
whose duties are the general supervision and direction of student life in 
the dormitories, the appointment of committees, and so forth. 

The Association, besides the mere maintaining of order, has charge of 
the social life in the dormitories, and conducts a series of Sunday Vesper 
Services, continues the fire drill, which was organized last year, and is 
making the store in North Hall basement, also organized last year with 
some trepidation, a splendid success and a source of great convenience. 
Much of its success is due to the able management of Elsie Allen, 1912, in 
whose charge the store has been ever since it was started. Occasional coffee 
parties given this year to the Seniors and Juniors, at which the most vital 
and important questions concerning self-government were freely dis- 
cussed. The gatherings were strictly informal, and have met with con- 
siderable success. 

One of these vital problems is this, "Shall the non-resident students 
— those not living in the dormitories, and not living at home — be organ- 
ized; and if so, how?" This question can hardly be settled at once, but 
one experiment has been tried which will help determine its solution. 
Twenty-five students living together in Brookline have organized under 
the Student Government Constitution, and are closely affiliated with the 
Association at the dormitories. So far the experiment seems to be success- 
ful, and it is greatly desired that the smaller groups of Simmons students 
follow the example of those in Brookline. 

Viola Jexxie Anderson. 



105 



Unmmottg College &tf)letic glsigoctatton 

Athletics are here to stay. Now that we have them firmly established, 
it is hard to believe that there was a time when we managed to exist without 
them. The Seniors can remember their Freshman year, when "a common 
grayness silvered everything," except for the one bright spot made by the 
tennis tournament. The bright spots are now more numerous, and one of 
the most hopeful signs of their becoming still brighter and still nore mumer- 
ous is, that the enthusiasm which started the S. A. A. in 1911 has not abated. 
Bettei still, loyalty has increased and is manifested by the marked growth 
in attendance at the meetings. 

The girls have come out for athletics remarkably well this year. It 
seems as if they ought to be congratulated, but I believe each girl would 
reply that she had received as much as she had given, and her only regret 
would be her inability to give more time to sports. For we have had such 
good times! 

The Association has made a slow advance, but we hope a sure one. 
Track has been established as one of the gala features of the springtime. 
Sweaters, S's, trophy cups, and numerals can now be given as rewards. 
Simmons was represented at the intercollegiate meetings of women's athletic 
associations held at Radcliffe on April 10, 1911, and at Smith on March 
16, 1912. 

The Athletic Association cannot help being a strong influence in the 
upward growth of Simmons. It stands for democracy, good-will, and 
healthful pleasure. It makes for clear thinking and clear feeling. Every 
girl in Simmons should become a member. We need your interest, your 
loyalty and your support, and with us all working together, we can make 
the Association as powerful as we will. 

Caroline Aldrich. 



107 




P 5 
t 3 
a, < 



Cfje 1912 jUtcrocosim 



Cbitorial ptoarb 

Editor-in-Chief, Glenna True 

Business Manager, Margaret E. Becker 



associate Cottons 



Marion Loring, '12 

{Subscription Editor) 

Caroline Aldrich, '12 
(Art Editor) 

Mabel Magee, '12 

(Assistant Business Manager) 

Beulah Wood, '12 



Elsie Basset, '12 



Elizabeth Walker, '13 
(Literary Editor) 

Barbara Walker, '14 



Mary Pratt, 'IS 



109 










> O q' 



<§ht Clut) 

The Glee Club this year was a process of evolution from a choir to a 
full-fledged Glee Club. There have been, in fact, two choirs with forty 
members each; two, on account of the fact that only half of the student- 
body attended chapel at one time. Membership in either of these choirs 
was made compulsory to those who wished to join the Glee Club. The 
girls showed themselves eager to give their time and cc-operatibn for the 
privilege. 

From these eighty choir members, then, the Glee Club was chosen, 
comprising about half of the larger body. Work was immediately com- 
menced and rehearsals were held at the chapel every Wednesday afternoon 
at four-thirty. The first matter at hand was to prepare for the spring 
concert, which was held in the refectory on March 16, 1912. The interest 
shown by all the members helped to improve the quality of work done, 
and to make the Glee Club a most important factor in our college life. 

The leader this year was Miss Mabel Daniels, formerly of Radcliffe 
College, where she contributed a great deal to the success of its Glee Club. 
Her energy and active interest have done much to bring our club up to its 
present standard. 

The two successful concerts given in March and at Commencement time 
show conclusively that the Glee Club has gained an ability far superior 
to that of former years, and that it is growing with the college in numbers, 
in capacity and in spirit. 

Program 



I. Estudiantina ........ 


Lacome 


Glee Club 




II. 11 Trovatore ........ 


Verdi 


Mandolin Club 




III. (a) The Nightingale's Song ..... 


Nevin 


(b) Little Pappocse 


Skerwin 


Glee Club 




IV. Solos 




(a) Down in the Forest ...... 


Ronald 


(b) At Parting 


Rogers 


(c) Allah . ■ 


Chadwick 


(d) Swallow Flying South ...... 


Foote 


Miss Edith Bullard Miss Eleanor Morris, Accomps 


mist 


V. Ah Sin 


Rolfe 


Mandolin Club 




VI. (a) In Fair Andalusia 


Victor Herbert 


Solo by Elizabeth Kennison 




(Arranged by Josephine Sherwood) 




(b) Dinah Doe ' Glee Club 




\ II. Lovely Springtime ....... 


Aletter 


Mandolin Club 




VIII Grinds 




IX. Alma Mater 




Mildred Libby, Accompanist 





111 




o S j 
£ Id 



Jlanbolm Club 

At a meeting of the Simmons College Mandolin Club in June, 1911, 
Carolyn Livingston was elected leader for the coming year. The club 
consists of sixteen members, many of whom have had experience in similar 
organizations. As has been the custom in previous years, the membership 
of the club has been limited to violin and mandolin players. In the April 
concert and at Commencement time the club co-operated with the Glee Club 
and added to the attractiveness of both occasions. 

First Mandolin: Anita Allen, Elizabeth Freeman, Elsey Larkin, Estelle 
Freeman (First Violin), Carolyn Livingston. 

Second Mandolin: Gladys Gordan (Second Violin), Margaret Hogan, 
Pauline Yager, Gertrude Brehm, Maude Pfaffman. 

Third Mandolin: Emma Poore (Third Violin), Anita Clarke, Laura 
Doring, Gladys Crosbie. 

Pianist: Alice Livingston. 



Following the custom which was established last year, Vesper services 
have been held in North Hall, on the alternate Sunday evenings of this year. 
The first service, at which Miss Arnold spoke, was held on the eighth of 
October. Since that time we have enjoyed hearing Dr. Reginald Howe, 
rector of the church of Our Saviour, Longwood; Dr. O. P. Gifford, of 
Brookline; Miss Calder, Secretary of the Young People's Branch of 
Foreign Missions; Dr. Lefavour, Mr. Littlefield, Dr. F. E. Farley, 
Miss George, in charge of the Y. W. C. A. work in Boston; Mrs. Guy 
Lowell; and Miss Hersey, connected with Trinity Church in Boston. 



113 




ATHLETICS 



BBI BIB 




W* 





*^f 











The finals of the 1911 tennis tournament were held May 27, on the 
dormitorv courts. 

Alary Dunbar, 1911 Belle Hinchliff, 1913 

Elinor Whitney, 1912 Helen Anderson, 1914 

represented their respective classes. 

The semi-finals between Aliss Dunbar and Aliss Anderson resulted in 
Miss Anderson's victory, with a score 4—6, 7-5, 6-2; between Aliss Whitney 
and Aliss Hinchliff, in Aliss Whitney's victory, with a score 6—1, 7-5. The 
excitement of the final match between Aliss Whitney and Aliss Anderson 
was tense, and resulted in the former's victory, with a score of 4—6, 6-4, 
6-3. Wild enthusiasm was shown by 1912, and after that — well, "things 
were doing." At dinner, 1912 inaugurated the custom of drinking from 
the tennis cup won in the afternoon. That custom was continued this 
year, and it is to be hoped that succeeding victorious classes will follow 
the precedent. 

The 1912 tournament, though scheduled for spring, was held in the fall 
to relieve the pressure on the spring activities. Elinor Whitney, 1912; 
Helen Anderson, 1914; Elizabeth Thurston, 1913; Olive Ruby. 1915; 
represented their classes. 

Miss Whitney and Aliss Ruby in the semi-finals finished with the 
score 7-5, 6-0, in Aliss Whitney's favor. Aliss Thurston and Aliss Ander- 
son with a score 6—1, 6-1 for Aliss Anderson. Unfortunately the final match 
between Miss Whitney and Aliss Anderson had to be postponed until 
October 26, on account of the rain, but on that date the score showed 6-1, 
6-0, for Aliss Whitney. 

1912 exults in her fourth championship in tennis, won her first year 
by Ruth Symonds, and the three succeeding years by Elinor Whitney, and 
challenges "future generations" to "go and do likewise!" 

117 




D. McCormick C. Aldrich A. Dunn L. Niss'en E. Whitney G. True 




I. Weed M. Gurdy I. Terrell 

D. Tyacke E. Walker 

M. Donaldson J. Pellman • C. Babcoci 



E 



EI6KE 




1914 holds the basketball cup as a result of the final victories over 1912 
and 1913 in the series of championship games in 1911. The Sophomore- 
Freshman game was held May 20, the day of the track meet, and it is 
only fair to say for 1913 that most of that team had been in the meet and 
were consequently not up to their mark. 

1913 The Line-up 1914 

J. E. Pellman forward C. M. Flanders 

C. G. Babcock forward H. M. Anderson 

D. W. Hughitt center C. E. Ekstrand 

D. Tvacke sjuard L. F. Nisbet 

E. M. Walker guard E. R. Bealer 

Score, 29-9, in favor of 1914. 
Referee, Miss Diall. 

On May 11 the Junior-Freshman game was held indoors. 



1912 






The Line-u 


P 




1914 


L. B. Nissen 






forward 






C. M. Flanders 


I. E. Adams 






forward 






I. E. Bassett 


G. M. True 






center 






H. M. Anderson 


E. W. Whitney 






guard 






E. R. Bealer 


C. E. Aldrich ' 






guard 






L. F. Xisbet 


D. I. McCormick 






guard 








Score, 14-11, 


in 


1914's 


favor. 








Referee, Miss 


D 


iall. 














VARSITY TEAM OF 


1910- 


-11 





N. M. Slack, 1911, center L. B. Nissen, 1912. forward 

E. Whitney, 1912. guard E. M. Walker, 1913. guard 

C. M. Flanders, 1914, forward 

119 




C. Ekstrand H. Anderson L. Nisbet D. Davol A. Bassett I. Bassett G. Ai 




A. Ray M. Brown M. Batcheller H. Kilbouri 

M. Titcomb M. Tulis 

M. Balthazar H. Putnam L. Mye 



Wf)t fflktoto&m 



L. B. Nissen, f. 
H. M. Anderson, f. 



VARSITY, 1911-12 



E. Whitney, g. 
E. M. Walker, 



G. M. True, c. 



L. B. Nissen, f. (Captain) 
A. R. C. Dunn, f. 
G. M. True, c. 



1912 



E. Whitney, g. 

C. Aldrich, g. (Manager) 

D. McCormick, g. 



J. E. Pellman, f. (Captain) 

C. G. Babcock, f. 

D. W. Hughitt, c. 
I. Weed, sub. 



1913 



E. M. Walker, g. (Manager) 
M. S. Donaldson, g. 
M. W. Gurdy, sub. 
I. Terrell, sub. 



H. M. Anderson (Captain), f. 
I. E. Bassett (Manager), f. 
C. E. Ekstrand c. 



1914 



L. F. Nisbet, 
A. S. Bassett, 
G. L. Abbott, 



1915 



FIRST TEAM 

H. Putnam, f. (Captain) 

M. Balthazar, f. 

M. Batcheller, c. 

M. Tulis, g. (Manager) 

M. Titcomb, g. 



SECOND TEAM 

A. Ray, f. 

B. Loring, f. 
M. Brown, c. 
M. D. Smith, g 
M. Libby, g. 



R. Bateman 
E. R. F. Freeman 
L. Meyers 
H. Kilbourn 



SUBSTITUTES 



121 



G. Minott 
E. J. Pippey 
A. Parkhurst 
A. Upham 




The first annual track-meet held by the S. A. A. took place May 20, 
1911, and there was something in the spirit and athletic ability shown that 
morning that would lead the most casual observer to think that Simmons 
was other than "that college for working women." There were but few 
events, but they were put through with the best form and the best spirit 
possible. 



J. L. Blanchard 



1911 



G. P. Fiske 



E. Whitney 
C. E. Aldrich 



1912 



G. M. True 
L. B. Nissen 



E. M. Walker 
D. Tyacke 



1913 



M. S. Donaldson 



D. W. Hughitt 
C. G. Babcock 



1914 



E. R. Bealer 
C. M. Flanders 
C. E. Ekstrand 
A. S. Bassett 
G. B. Neide 



L. Pinnock 

E. R. Murphy 

M. Y. Ostrander 

I. E. Bassett 

L. F. Nisbet 



THE EVENTS 

BASKETBALL THROW FOR DISTANCE 

Elinor Whitney, 63 feet, 1\ inches Clara Flanders, 62 feet, \ inch 

Lillian Nisbet, 54 feet 

122 



QTfje fflicrocotfm 



50- Yard Dash 

Elizabeth Walker, 7§ seconds 
Glenna M. True, Elinor Whitney, tie, 7§ seconds 
Dorothy Hughitt, 8 seconds 

STANDING BROAD JUMP 

Glenna M, True, 7 feet, 3f inches Dorothy W. Hughitt, 6 feet, lOjin. 

Elsie Murphy, 6 feet, 1| inches 

RUNNING HIGH JUMP (ROPE MARKER) 

Jessie L. Blanchard, 4 feet, 8 inches 

Elinor Whitney, Elizabeth Walker, 4 feet, 5 inches 

Dorothy Tyacke, 4 feet, 4 inches 



C. G. Babcock 
E. M. Walker 



RELAY RACE 

SOPHOMORES, 29 SECONDS 



D. Tyacke 
D. W. Hughitt 



E. Whitney 
C. E. Aldrich 



JUNIORS, 31 SECONDS 



L. B. Nissen 
G. M. True 



L. Pinnock 

M. Y. Ostrander 



FRESHMEN, 32 SECONDS 



G. Neide 
E. R. Bealer 



A blue and yellow "S" was awarded to E. Whitney, G. M. True and 
E. M. Walker, for establishing records in the individual events, while J. 
Blanchard was given an S and the small silver trophy for breaking her high- 
jump record established in 1910. 1912 scored 19 points, the highest num- 
ber of points in the meet; the Sophomores followed with 17; the Freshmen 
with 6; and the Seniors with 5. Elinor Whitney held the highest individual 
score of 9 points, Glenna True and Elizabeth Walker tied with 7 points, 
and Jessie Blanchard stood third with 5 points. 

The Guild Garden Party, in the afternoon, completed the gayest day 
yet on record here at Simmons. 



Confession of faith (Com. Law). 

"An innkeeper is a man who keeps an inn to keep people.' 

123 



<§trte Wf\o Wwv tfje "g>" 



Nellie M. Slack, Basketball 
Glenna M. True, Track, Basketball 



& 





Elinor Whitney, 
Tennis, Basketball, Track 






Jessie L. Blanchard, 
Track 



Louise B. Nissen, Basketball 



Elizabeth M. Walker, 
Track, Basketball 

Clara M. Flanders, 
Basketball 

Helen Anderson, 
Basketball 



124 




& 



V 



m 






C1IETIE5 



Septembei 


-18- 


Septembei 


-23 


Septembei 


■26 


Septembei 


■29 


Septembei 


■30 


October 


3 


October 


9 


October 


10 


October 


14 


October 


16 


October 


19 


October 


21 


October 


27 


October 


29 


October 


29 


November 


3 


November 


7 


November 


9 


November 


10 


November 


17 


November 


19 


November 


22 


November 


30 


December 


14 


December 


16 


December 


21- 


January 


2 


January 


5 


January 


10 



foetal Calendar 

1911 

-20 New girls met and initiated by Welcoming Committee. 
Eight hundred and thirty-one members joined the Guild. 

(They didn't know it, but they did.) 
Freshman Indignation Meeting: Resolved that elevator 

should be at service of students. 
Student Government Dance. 

First Vesper Service: All Freshmen present and four upper- 
classmen. 
North Hall filled with Suitors. (We cannot put this in 

every time for lack of space.) 
Monday Tea in Students' Room. 
Four o'clock Senior Tea in South Hall. 
Guild Reception. 
Junior Tea for Class President. 
Four o'clock Sophomore Tea. 
Tennis Tournament: 1912's DAY. 
Freshman rules posted. 
Hallowe'en Party. 

Sunday Breakfast Parties established. 
Five-weeks' Marks: It is not etiquette to express surprise 

at the sight of trunks at this juncture. 
Library Seniors go to Worcester. 
Senior-Freshman Party. 

1912 plays 1914: Don't ask foolish questions. 
Paris Fashions just received in Millinery Class: "Balloons 

are being worn high on the late fall models." 
Student Government Conference at Barnard. 
Noticeable coolness toward professors who assign tests at 

this time of year. 
Thanksgiving Vacation. 
Junior Candy Sale. 
Christmas Party. 
2 Christmas Vacation. 

1912 

Senior Candy Sale. 
Seniors March in Chapel. 

College Graduates found the "Society for the Suppression 
of the Junior Who Said Ec. I was a Cinch Course." 

126 



VL\)t fllicrotogm 



January 13 Junior Play 

January 16 Library Seniors lunch in Providence. 

January 17 Girls begin to put off till to-morrow what they should have 

done to-day for Mid-Years. 
January 24-30 MID-YEARS. 

"Birds of a feather flunk together." 
February 3 Remaining Dormitory Freshmen have a sleigh-ride to 

Miss Arnold's. 
February 9 Senior Tea with Mrs. Dewing. 
February 16 Mrs. Dewing overrun with Seniors for Tea. 
February 22, 23, 24 College body "cut for luck" over the holiday. 
February 29 I. M. Class visit Tewksbury. 
Washington Birthday Party. 
Junior Tag Day. 

President's Reception to Corporation, Faculty and Dormi- 
tory Girls. 
Junior-Freshman Party. 
Mrs. Farley's Tea for Seniors. 
Microcosm Vivisection Meeting. 
Freshmen find lockers not practicable for the rearing of 

rabbits. 
Glee Club Concert. 

Intercollegiate Athletic Conference at Smith College. 
Library Seniors add sixteen hours to their schedule. 
Easter Vacation. (Courtesy alone excuses the nomen- 
clature.) 
Folk-Dancing. "Rollicking" introduced in Simmons. 
Senior-Faculty Prospect Party. 
Sophomore-Freshman Party. 
JUNIOR CANDY SALE. 
Patriots' Day. Senior Howl — three wonderful days at 

Scituate. 
1912-14 Match Game. 
Junior Prom. 
1913-15 Match Game. 
Sophomore Luncheon. 
Play-off for Basketball Championship. 
Freshman Frolic. 
Track Meet. 

Miss Arnold entertained the Seniors in Newton. 
Tennis Doubles Tournament. 

FINALS: When the Faculty divides what you think you 
know by what they think you don't know. 
127 



March 


1 


March 


7 


March 


8 


March 


9 


March 


10 


March 


11 


March 


15 


March 


16 


March 1 


5-18 


March 


20 


March 21-22 


April 


5 


April ' 


6 


April 


14 


April 


16 


April 


19 


April 


23 


April 


26 


April 


29 


May 


3 


May 


5 


May 


11 


May 


18 


May 


22 


Mav 


26 


May 


27-7 



QTfje iWicrotosm 



Senior Weeps: (placed here as being the last free time that 
can be so devoted, and ceremony being one which is 
considered necessary, and "the thing" on going out 
in the world. 

Baccalaureate Services. 

Senior Dance. 

Class Day. 

Glee Club Concert. 

Commencement. 

Alumnae Luncheon. 

President's Reception. 

Senior Farewell Luncheon. 



" T he Queen is dead : Long live the Queen, '13 ! 



June 


9 


June 


10 


June 


11 


June 


11 


June 


12 


June 


12 


June 


12 


June 


13 



3Fumor $rom. 



Even the Seniors agreed that the refectory looked attractive in its pink 
decorations with the mental reservation that yellow was much prettier. 
To others less prejudiced the effect seemed perfect as a background for the 
dainty dresses of the Juniors, and the black coats of the fortunate men. 
This could be seen from the outside, but for the Juniors on the inside the 
effect was even more satisfying. Not once did that train about which 
she had had so many apprehensions, give her the least trouble, it seemed 
to realize intuitively the importance of the occasion. The music was per- 
fect, but the dances far too short, and, though it could scarcely be said that 
the intermission came too soon, for with it came the supper (and for once 
realization quite equalled anticipation), the last dance should certainly 
have been postponed, for at least half an hour. But it was over at last, 
and the refectory settled back into its every-day existence with one more 
successful Junior Prom added to its memories of pleasant events, which 
have taken place within its walls. 



A bl uff is an external something for an internal nothing. 
128 




sh"* 



LI 

MICRQCHAOS 



1&\)t jftfltcrocosm 



INSTRUCTOR'S HANDY-LIST OF BROMIDES — U AND I 
HURDEM 

Next ! 

Isn't it awfully hot in here? 

Now, in my own state of California — 

Hands in position. Start. 

I see what you're trying to say, but — 

To go back again to — 

(A great help to class in note-taking.) 

This goes "so-fashion." 

Next ! 

(Repeated because of its extreme usefulness.) 

Could I have your attention a moment? 

Why — that came in your to-day's lesson. 

I'll just leave these two points with you for you to think over. 

Of course you know — 

(Of course!) 

Now, suppose we leave this subject and come back to it later. 
(Also helpful to class notes.) 

The following bromidic advertisement may be used with Great Suc- 
cess ( ?) : 

WANTED: A clear understanding by each girl in my department 
that my subject is incalculably more important than any other on her 
schedule, that it should be allotted its full number of hours' preparation, 
and should take precedence of all other courses. 

I should like to see the following after class — 

(Always a tactful way to create a general atmosphere of repose among 
members of the class.) 

Miss , Miss ? Is Miss absent? 

(Extraordinary care should be taken to use this form; Miss — may 
be taking a last look at her text, and thus be overlooked.) 

Just a minute, ladies — 

If that were not the first time you had tried pop-overs, I should call 
that a perfect sample — 

I get your point, but the idea I had in mind — 

Corridors must be quiet. 

Learn to think. 

Be as brief as possible; leave out all details. 

No gassing or guessing; just give me plain facts. 

That's possible, but — 



A RECOMMENDED SULPHIDE 

We will omit the test. 

130 



QFfje fflittoto&m 









1 




3 


1 j 


■lull M jKI 





"A white card! Oh!" (I've heard them say.) 
"Earliest op — , that means to-day. 
I guess I'd better go and see, 
What on earth she wants of me." 

"When can I see her?" "That whole liner" 
"And I must sit and wait my time?" 
"It's half past one now, goodness me, 
And I can't see her until three?" 



Half past four! "What's that you say?" 
"The Dean will see no more to-day?" 
The moral is, much to your sorrow, 
"Opportunity" always comes to-morrow 

131 



(ECfte fRtcrocogtn 



RULES FOR THE BUSINESS METHODS II 

Students must always remove the inked pad of the Neostyle when 
instructor descends from closing adjacent window. 

Ladies are excluded from Room 118 after five o'clock. Delinquents 
please see the President. If work cannot be finished — don't do it. 

Students must refrain from exclamations while using the Oliver. 

Students are strictly limited in their use of paper on the Dalton to not 
more than two miles a day. 

Mirrors and wash cloths should be kept handy while using blue copying 
ribbons. Mirrors borrowed from instructor shall be returned before the 
close of the hour. 

N. B. The closet in 117 contains explosives. 

Individual eccentrics on the part of the Noiseless will not excuse 
mistakes. 

A cost charge of ten cents per dozen will be made for headache powders 
used by phonograph dictatees. 

Work on the Burrough's may be substituted for the week's gym- 
nasium requirement. 

The Chapter of Job should be added to the prescribed reading on the 
Comptometer. 

(a) Students may consider the work on this machine verified after 
eleven attempts. 



RULES FOR THE OUTDOOR ATHLETIC FIELD 

1. Spend all your free time outside, but do not cut to go out, as one is 
easily seen from the window. 

2. Don't "tromp" on the grass, even if you can find any to "tromp" 
on. 

3. If you lose a ball over the fence wait until you've lost all there are, 
and then — hurry into class. 

4. Better not put the net up when you play tennis. It's apt to get 
in the way of the balls. 

5. Do not express surprise if the college tennis balls bounce. 

6. Aim all balls at the windows. They are less likely to hit them than 
if you aim another direction. 

7. Wear hats in passing through halls going from shower-room to 
outdoor field. Your appearance will be more respectable. 

132 



W)t iHlicrocosm 




Blu© Monday for Thaddays 



If phantoms and ghosts that walk forth in the night 
Would but keep those reserve books just out of my sight, 
I could peacefully sleep in the depths of my cot 
And not have bad dreams from those "Regions of Thought. 

How they find such books useful, sticks me, I confess, 

And why recommend them, I never could guess! 

Or why those " required," by some rule of fate, 

Have a size in square miles, and have tons for their weight. 

I've worn out ten baskets — my temper as well, 

And the lift's always sticking by some magic spell, 

Monday's indigo blue and has been for an age, 

Still the girls lug home tomes and don't open a page. 

133 



W$t fHicrocosim 





I. The Household Economics Girl 

We pity you, poor mortal, not for idle pity's sake, 

. . . The horror of your schedule proves your talk of "work" no fake: 

We smell you serving breakfasts during seventh hour p.m. 

(All samples which have come to us, we never would condemn.) 
But oh we think it's sad 
That when your rolls are bad, 

You can't nurse retrospective grief, 

Just wash the dishes and be brief, — 
Housekeeping may be tedious and its routine you may hate, 
But you'll be sure of husbands when at last you graduate. 



II. The Secretarial Girl 

Your fingers may be blunted from long hammering the keys, 
The fear of copying tests may give you dislocated knees, 
Your forearm may be paralyzed from work-up-speed dictation, 
But your job will bring a surplus over cost of respiration. 

Just set your teeth for fight 

And get your transcript right, 
"The pen is mightier than the sword," 
You'll earn more than your room and board; 
. . . The Ec. girl has an easy time? Cheer up, don't envy her, 
Gloat on proleptic drawings of your forty dollars per. 

134 



€fce jfflicrocofim 





III. The Library Girl 

Categorically speaking — everybody knows it's true, 
Library girls at Simmons have the nicest things to do, 
It's easy — why, they dash off cataloging by the ton, 
And History of Libraries is only so much fun; 
Skim through some Documents, 
Omit their Reference, 
And best of all, you'll all agree — 
In cash accounts that dad may see, 
They find it most convenient to charge up for balance 
$5 . . . supernumerary trips to B. P. L. 



I\ . The Science Girl 

We never see you anywhere about the college halls, 
And so we know you're busy in your laboratory stalls; 
You're maybe slicing rabbits or prodding poor frog's brains 
(As the college does the students') just to watch the reflex pains; 
But tho' your ranks are thin 
You're surely bound to win, 

You'll go where we can never go, 

. . . To Europe — yes, we know it's so. 
To GERMANY, for science, — ah, be thoughtful where you roam, 
Send picture postcards to the girls you've left behind at home. 

135 



ic fflitvotagm 



HEART TO HEART TALKS WITH ADVISERS 

The letters printed below are genuine and illustrate the kind of ques- 
tions which comes before advisors for solution. We are urged to speak 
frankly, and we do. 

(Obtained from the English Department after some persuasion.) 
Dear Miss : 

I was much discouraged at the time of the last "flunk notes," because 
I think I am more apt to become depressed than most girls, at least so my 
mother thinks, and that being the case, I wondered if the instructors would 
just as lief not give me "low standing," as I am afraid it will result in my 
having to leave college, which I am sure Miss Arnold would be sorry to 
have me do, and I myself like Simmons, and should like to do all I can to 
help it along, so will you speak to my instructors about this matter, as I 
am a little shy about doing it myself. 

(From the Gym. Department.) 

Dear Miss : 

I have been troubled with my throat ever since I had tonsilitis when 
I was five, and although that is some time ago, I have not gotten over the 
effects. I am a little uneasy as to the danger of the germs in the dump which 
the girls are always speaking of, and after writing my doctor, I have come 
to the conclusion that if Miss Arnold would allow me to be fifteen minutes 
late each morning, I should then be able to come to college by way of Har- 
vard Medical School and Huntington Avenue, thus avoiding the unhealthy 
locality. Do you think it would be wise for me to take this precaution. 
Of course I should substitute the extra exercise for my gym periods. 



3frt Jfflemortam 
CAFETERIA 

Died at 

SIMMONS REFECTORY 

APRIL 2, 1911 



136 



&f)e microcosm 



SOME PLICiMTS OF SIMMONSITES 



Ten little Simmonsites, — 

One forgot to sign 
The Honor Statement in a quiz, 

And then there were nine. 

Nine little Simmonsites, — 

Oh, woeful fate! 
One got on the card list, 

And then there were eight. 

Eight little Simmonsites, 

All with hopes of heaven, 

One went thro' the Muddy River 
Then there were seven. 

Seven little Simmonsites 

In an awful fix! 
One was sent for by the Dean, 

And then there were six. 

Six little Simmonsites, — 
One could not survive 

History 2 at mid-years', 

And then there were five. 



Five little Simmonsites, 

Miss Cook at the door, 

One of them had fixed the latch, 
So later there were four. 

Four little Simmonsites 

Praying for a "P"; 
One of them received a flunk, 

And then there were three. 

Three little Simmonsites 

On the Avenue; 
One met a Harvard Med., 
And then there were two. 

Two little Simmonsites 

Dying for some fun; 
To the theater with a man, 

And then there was one. 

One little Simmonsite 

With cap and gown well won, 
She alone got a degree. 

And now my essay's done. 



LIBRARY SCHOOL CONUNDRUMS 

1. What is it that Library Seniors must not lose but cannot find? 
Answer. — Time. 

2. What are black and white and red all over? 
Answer. — Revised cataloging slips. 

3. What course Senior year is pointless? 
Answer. — Library Practice. 

4. Who Isadore to the U. S. Public Documents? 
Answer. — Miss Mudge. 

5. Why is Ethics Thesis undone? 
Answer. — Because we're Dewing it. 

6. How can the library school help the lunch-room? 
Answer. — Lend them the Cutter tables. 

7. What wine is prescribed at Simmons? 
Answer. — Portuguese. 

8. Why is the library school expensive? 
Answer. — Because of its charging systems. 

9. Who are the college co-eds? 
Answer. — Gym. and Phil. 

137 



GTfje fflicrocosm 



Why? — {with NO apologies to Kipling) 

When the Simmons College student meets the man-prof in exam, 
She bluffs to fool the monster who will often pass the sham; 
But a lady thus insulted calmly passes out a "fail," 
For the feminine instructor is more deadly than the male. 

When our History professor sees that interest has waned, 
He only wiggles sideways and appears a trifle pained; 
But the Economics lady sternly follows up the trail, 
For the feminine instructor is more deadly than the male. 

The German man-prof's lesson in translation every day, 

Takes a student thirty minutes to prepare for, so they say; 

But the Fraulein gives six hours — and the students' deaths entail, 

For the feminine instructor is more deadly than the male. 

Now the man-prof, stern at Harvard, but more kind and gentle here, 
Will ignore a classroom whisper if it's floating in the rear; 
Very rarely will he squarely try to catch one in the act 
And detain one at the doorway to inform one of the fact. 

Sometimes pity will impel him, 'ere he gives the idler "low" 

To become a little lenient and avoid the cruel blow; 

Mirth will often please his fancy — wondrous statements will perplex, 

And the student, glad and happy, doesn't get what she expects. 

But the woman-prof at college, every mark on each week's test, 
Proves she loves to cause us L notes, thinks that flunking is a jest; 
And she dares not make concessions, lest the students tell the tale, 
So the feminine instructor is more deadly than the male. 

The man-prof in his lectures never sits upon a chair, 

He prefers a shaky side-arm and his feet go anywhere, 

(In the desk-drawer if he pleases), — but the women-profs all quail, 

At such comfort, such good nature — so they're deadlier than the male. 

The student's heart is longing for the studies out of reach, 

For the subjects she is taking they don't let the man-prof teach; 

If she chooses a division with a nice man-prof in sight, 

They will change it at the office to Miss Someone's over night. 

Oh, whatever course she's taking, any girl, no matter who, 
Had best be quite an angel if she wants to struggle through; 
For the woman leads in numbers, and this truth can never fail, 
That the feminine instructor is more deadly than the male. 

138 



£1)c ftlicrocosin 




12.35 



Rattle, thump, clash, clang, 
Jangle, bump, smash, bang, 
Giggle, shout, crack, boom — 
Quiet, peaceful, luncheon-room 

Spoon, fork, knife, tray, 
Soup, crackers? — not to-day. 
Ham, beef, chicken, lamb, 
Salmon sandwiches or jam, — 



Icecream, cookies, where's your check? 
Have to have it right on deck. 
Snitch a table! Nab a chair! 
Can't that girl push over there? 

There's a place, go grab it quick, 
"Engaged!" my word, that makes 

me sick. 
There's a table, all serene, — 
Oh! my dear! Reserved for Dean. 

139 



Mrs. Farley 
Miss Mitzlaff 
Miss Jackson 
Miss Diall 
Miss Blood 
Mrs. Norris 
Miss Robbins 
Miss Kingsbury 
Miss Scott 
Miss Holbrook 
Mrs. Brackett 
Miss Craig 
Miss Elliott 
Miss Cooper 
Madame Mottet 
Mrs. Mark 
Miss Patten 
Miss Howard 
Miss Crowe 
Miss Stark 
Mrs. Campbell 



YEGtfhUINEin 





Find her head. Her pres- 
Hast thou not the cheek, 
freely. Marry, and sweet 

its written word. Do not 



ADVICE OF KING SOLOMON I 

"For Solomon had seven hundred wives''' 

1. My child, seek not over much to know the workings of thy mind, 
the little thou hast thrust upon thee will bring thee trouble enough. 

2. Know that the faculty are masters of opportunity and thee — 
'tis inclination makes them smart — later thou art to smart without the 
inclination. 

3. Wouldst thou know the Fenway's past? 
ent? Read her mouth. Her future? Avant! 

4. If a professor question shrewdly, answei 
words may hide the bitter pill of truth. 

5. Trust not the written word for 
professional smiles deceive more sweetly. 

6. A Senior with a smile is like the laughter of little children; as 
a holiday unforetold is her loveliness and her light. 

7. If a Sophomore strive to fool thee, suffer it; but see thou, my child, 
that her striving be to thy liking, so thou mayst make her love thee in the 
end. 

8. Wouldst thou be warned? The silence of the silence of the rest 
room is deeper than that of the Dean's office. It may also be more fickle 
and more fleeting. 

9. Can man gather flames in his hand and not be burned? Can a 
Junior work lightly and not be consumed? 

10. Three things shalt thou consider holy; yea, ever four utterly holy: 
The President's office, the silence of the corridors, strange little Freshmen, 
and the sacredness of a cap and gown. 

140 



STRUCTORS' TEA 




Miss 


Campbell 


Miss 


Beckler 


Miss 


Stocking 


Miss 


Wilkinson 


Mrs. 


Bolton 


Miss 


Mitzlaff 


Miss 


WlGGIN 


Miss 


Dike 


Miss 


GOLLER 


Mrs. 


Freeman 


Mrs. 


Coe 


Miss 


Craig 


Miss 


Spooner 


Mrs. 


Ogg 


Miss Johnson 


Miss 


Coffin 


Miss 


Walker 


Mrs. 


Hanford 


Miss 


Gloster 


Miss 


Sacker 


Miss 


Crowe 



WOODS 



What's the bell for that I hear: 

That's for Woods. 
And is that him, drawing near? 

So soon? Woods? 
He's a very clever lad, 
Furthers anybody's fad, 
From the President's to Thad. 
Genial Woods. 



An expressman with a bundle 

Calls for Woods. 
If there's anything to trundle, 

Just find Woods. 
The best kind of friend to make, 
For there's nothing he can't take, 
Be it chapel slips, or "cake," 

'Cause he's Woods. 



Can you have the blackboards fixed, 

Mr. Woods? 
How did all these slides get mixed, 

Mr. Woods? 
Can I get a locker key? 
Can you fix a door for me ? 
Bring some ink to 318, 

Quickly, Woods. 



He began with us in nineteen two, 

Did Woods. 
And he said he'd "see us through, 1 

Did Mr. Woods. 
He's a friend to all creation, 
If you're lacking information, 
Of somebody's name or station, 

Who knows? WOODS. 



141 



Efte iflicrocosm 



Listen, friends, oh, have you ever heard this sentiment expressed: 
That Simmons, as a college, is "so different from the rest?" 
We will tell you — 
Tell you true, 
To what causes this is due. 



At Holyoke they go to class just fifteen times a week, 

(This arrangement calls for study only when one takes the freak.) 

Now at SIMMONS things are managed in a wholly different way, 

We skip to classes joyously full seven times a day. 

Be blithe and gay, 

Let's sing and play, 

For we have recitations only seven times a day! 



At Vassar there are dramas, yes, and operettas, too, 

But such affairs at SIMMONS would just never, never do; 

No big associations giving Shakespeare dramas here, 

We get along quite nicely on one ten-cent show a year. 

Wink back the tear, 

Let's yell and cheer, 

For we may shine resplendent in one ten-cent show a year! 



At Smith there are sororities of Latin, French, and Greek. 

You couldn't find an English one at SIMMONS, should you seek; 

But never mind, there is a club in which your name is billed. 

For every girl in college is a member of the Guild. 

Let rage be stilled, 

With joy be filled, 

For every girl (for fifty cents) may join the Student Guild! 



At Radcliffe there is basketball, for Radcliffe loves the game, 

They play with other colleges and bring their college fame; 

But SIMMONS is "so different" — our Varsity's elite, 

It only plays Sub-Varsity, so never knows defeat. 

"Oh wild and sweet, 

The words repeat," 

Our Varsity plays all home games, and never knows defeat! 

142 



Since Aesthetic Dicing- SUuct, Simons, -- Wh M Not ? 



vi.. ; •-:>:/-? »3| 




"Pioneers" at Simmons 



Wt)t jUtcrocosm 



EVOLUTION AT SIMMONS — BY A CAREFUL BIOLOGIST 

Freshman Year 
One bright Bagdad couch cover. 
Six high school sofa pillows. 
One memory book. 

Three pictures by Howard Chandler Christy. 
One huge Simmons Banner. 
One unused manicure set. 
Nine high school banners. 
One family group, framed. 
One Baby Stuart. 

Fifteen unframed photographs of girls with large hair ribbons. 
One photo of boys' basketball team, framed. 

Sophomore Year 
One green burlap couch cover. 
One green screen. 
One green rug. 
Ten green cushions. 

One Japanese lamp shade with green tints. 
One pair of buff curtains with green border, 
One new tea set. 

Three pieces toward silver toilet set. 
Six college banners (Dartmouth). 
One Sir Galahad. 
Five fat note-books. 

Three framed photographs of certain Seniors in cap and gown. 
One "Don't Worry." 
Twelve jars raspberry jam in washstand. 



144 



(Efje ffflicrocosm 



Junior Year 
One coffee percolator on dusty tea table. 
One huge line-a-day. 
Three volumes of Browning. 
One comfortable arm-chair. 
No unframed photos. 
Two pink roses in tiny vase. 
One modern Madonna. 
Five volumes Van Dyke. 
One Foot-path to Peace. 
One massive brass desk set. 
Twenty-five memorandum slips on desk. 
One caller every Friday night. 
One daily letter. 
Six dance orders arranged carelessly on desk. 

Senior Year 

One esthetic twig in 

One esthetic vase. 

Two ancient brass candlesticks. 

One esthetically framed bit of old tapestry. 

Two faithful devotees — always near. 

One air of importance. 

One thousand high ideals, constantly discussed. 

One small-salaried position on the horizon. 



"O wad the power the giftie gie us," etc. 

(Overheard in the dump) 
First Workman: "What's that brown fence all around the back of 
that building for?" 

Second Workman: "O, that's where they walk 'em." 



tEljE fflitvoto&m 



"DAFFYS" 

From the "Simmons Amerrycan" 

When R. G. Stearns displays the newest styles, is Helen Green with 
envy? 

If a girl was afflicted with locomotor-ataxia, would Barbara Walker? 

If she wouldn't, Beulah or Ellen Wood. 

"If H. Anderson fell down, would the ground gripper?" 

Ij anyone heard the 1912 Microcosm was pretty poor, would it be 
True ? 

If a chicken peeps, does Miss Jane Crowe? 

Would Dr. Lefavour a larger choir? 

If a student was in danger of a flunk, would Merta Warner? 

If a girl cuts class, will Miss Chase her, or would Dr. Mark her absent? 

If no one paid her Guild Dues, would Jennie P. Clement? 

If someone gave the college the land around the Dump, would they give 
Faythe Akers? 

"Wie gents" is German, but is Olive French? 

If someone yelled, would Joy Maunck her? 

If she saw a good looking hat, would Christine Price it? 

Who landed on Elizabeth Rock? 

Did Gertrude Mandelstamer in Com. Law? 

If she fainted, would they give Doris Ayer? 

What plan did Agnes Hatch? 

If he is going in town, where is Mildred Bent? 

If I take this, what will Helen Cary? 

If there wasn't A. Light, might not Katherine Fall? (It is most 
probable?) 



146 



Cfce fHtcrocosm 



FACULTY TRAGEDY 

The Barbour, a Gross-mann, was Dewing Col. Sedgwick. As he 
Hughes and Coombs, he suddenly cries, Mitzlaff, "Ha-ha, Goller, your 
Harris Greene." The Colonel, not liking impertinent criticism, started up, 
swearing vengeance. The Barbour ran for his life, out the door, and the 
enraged Colonel gave Chase, Stark-mad, as in Rabe (s) yelling, "You 
shall Di(all)." But the Barbour Bolton to the Underwood, near Maxfield, 
where Sargent Eldridge, a Tschaler (jailer) hit him with a Bent(ley) Spear. 
Then they traced him to a Craig where a Holbrook flows, and the Marks of 
Blood were upon his Stocking. They enGaged a priest for the funeral; 
and of Jordan, Morse & Coe they bought a Coffin, of the newest Stiles and 
Patten, with Bracketts, and, as the Sillcox crowed, they had Kings-bury 
him. And there was a goodly company of bearers. Norris this all. 
The hard-hearted villains Hatched a scheme, wherewith they should feast 
and gloat upon their deed of revenge. Cook Campbell begged to feed the 
human Robbins, as they called themselves. " Lemmi Cook them some 
Bacon and Oggs," said he. "How 'ard should they be?" called one of the 
company — 

But here we leave them (for lack of names). Verdict unknown, may 
be had upon application after June twentieth, Room 208. 



A Junior, hearing that the Seniors were seeking a fundamental basis 
of all human action, offers PATIENCE; for she says: 
If you want to see 

The Dean, 

Mid-Year marks, 

The choir march in step, 

A vacant hour on your schedule; 



If you want to get 



Lunch-room checks, 

Perfect transcripts, 

Books in Bates Hall, 

Parker House rolls accepted, 

Engineer to open your locker, 

A new book at Supply store, 

Off the card list, 

A couch in the rest-room, 

or 

A shower, 

You must have PATIENCE. 

147 




<^ 



Lie Rni 



mis 





p 




MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



y^^HE MICROCOSM BOARD 
\^J HEREIN EXPRESSES 
THEIR SINCERE APPRE- 
CIATION TO 

Cfjamplam & Jfarrar 

161 TREMONT STREET 

AND RECOMMENDS TO FUTURE 
CLASSES THE EXCELLENT 
WORKMANSHIP AND THOUGHT- 
FUL INTEREST DISPLAYED IN 
THE PHOTOGRAPHS IN THIS 
BOOK. $ $ $ $ $ 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 




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Glassware 



_, ... _ The newest shapes and decorations of 

I he Athena Pattern. TABLE WAREand ORNAMENTAL 

French China. PIECES constantly arriving from the best 

Potteries and Glass Factories of England, France, Germany, Austria, China, Japan and 

America. Patrons will find extensive exhibits in 



Dinner Set Department 
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Art Pottery Rooms 
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Hotel and Club Department 



In our KITCHENWARE DEPARTMENT is an extensive variety of Souffle 
Dishes, Egg Poachers, Cafeteriers, Casseroles, Cocottes, Shirred Egg Dishes, etc., in 
French Porcelain and other wares. Also plain and decorated wares for kitchen and 
pantry. The Blue Willow pattern in full assortment. Yellow Mixing Bowls and 
Nappies, Blanc-mange Moulds, Blue Edge Pie Plates, etc. 

STUDENTS' REQUISITES 

Lamps, Tea Sets, Chocolate Pots and Sets, Candlesticks, Welsh Rarebit Plates, 
Jardinieres, Ferneries, Bureau Sets, Bon Bon Dishes, Plates of all kinds, odd Pitchers 
in endless variety, as well as Bric-a-Brac suitable for complimentary and wedding gifts. 
Glassware of all grades. Inspection invited. 

Jones, McDuffee & Stratton Co. 

China and Glass Merchants 
33 Franklin, COr. Hawley Street, Near Washington and Summer Streets 



Foreign Books C. S. DAY & CO. 

Established 1S9S 

jfamtlp GCrabe a H>pectaltp 

Meats, Fruits, Vegetables 

:w Faneuil He 
North Side 

BOSTON 
The Old Corner Book Store 

Incorporated 

Standard and New Books, Medical and 

Scientific Books, Prayer Books and 

Hymnals 



Large Stock of French, German, 

Italian and Spanish Books 

Send for Catalogues 

Bitter & Jflrbhe 



12(1 Buvlston Street ' 



B. F. Macy 

Formerly of F. A. Walker tf Co. 

Kitchen Furnishings and Fire- 
place Fittings 

410 Boylston Street (near Berkeley Street) 

BOSTON 



27 and 29 Bromfield Street, Boston 
Massachusetts: Telephone 7069 or 7070 Main 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



R. H. STEARNS €r CO. THE LOMBARD 



FOK several years 
we have made 
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many Public and 
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shall be glad to send you 
samples of materials 
and quote prices if 
desired. 



R. H. STEARNS 6- CO. 



tf 



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"Florists 

143 Tremont St., Boston 

Opposite Temple Place Subway Station 
Choice Roses, Violets and Orchids 

Constantly on hand 

Mail and Telephone Orders 

Promptly Filled 

Telephones Oxford 574 and 22167 



Blouses, Skirts, Waists 

Mackinaw Coats are Made 

Specially for 

COLLEGE GIRLS 

Send for New Illustrated Booklet 

HENRY S. LOMBARD 

22-26 Merchants Row 
Boston, Mass. 

Dieges & Clust 

"If we made it, it's right."' 

Cngrabeb ^tattoncrp 

Class mn* Jflerjals 

We have a rich and unusual line oj samples 
with many new effects in Dance Orders, Class- 
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Write Dept. K for samples 
lfi9 Tremont Street Boston, Mass. 



Telephone 3809-M Back Bat 



&mes & #tntp 

Ginty Roofing Shields 

Sheet Metal Work 

Roofing 

Gutters, Skylights, Automobile Tanks, Conductors, 

Stoves, Drip !',■•: . I'r>:hlal"r<. Heaters and Guards 

Chimney Caps 

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MICROCOSM ADVKRTISKMENTS 




E patronize this publication that you may 

patronize us. That's what makes the wheels 

go round. We sell Silks, Crepes and Pongees, 

and we sell Waists and Kimonos, made from 

our imported fabrics, and we sell them at extremely 

reasonable prices. We hope we may shortly have the 

privilege of selling something to you. 1$ (£l r$ t$J 

WALTER M. HATCH & CO. 

43 AND 45 SUMMER STREET 



Satisfaction and Real Economy 

RESULT FROM BUYING 

Meats that are the Best 

YOU GET THAT KIND FROM 

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Dealers in 

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Stalls 20-22-24 New Faneuil Hall Market 
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putlbers 

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Telephone Haymarket 1279 

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and 

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for 
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We grind our own chocolate and'know how 
choice the materials are that give Lowney's 
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All the Lowney Chocolate products and 
Lowney's Cook Book are of the same 
superfine quality. 



COCOA 



The choicest cocoa beans grown in South 
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ground to a fine powder without "treat- 
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DELICIOUS AT BREAKFAST 
GOOD FOR YOU AT NIGHT 



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are thoroughly equipped 
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all large users of the 
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store at 



222 SUMMER STREET 

(OPP. SOUTH STATION) 



H 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENT 



"BACH-LOR-GIRL" HOSIERY 



These trade-mark stockings are made of the most durable imported yarns, and 
believe them to be.the best wearing stockings produced at this weight; guarantee 



I goes 



I 1] on h 



pai 



Manufactured fur, and sold 



by, C. F. He 



'"Bach-lor-Girl" No. "29" Guaran- 
teed Stockings, medium weight 
cotton, with six-thread spliced heel 
and toe 



Bach-lor-Girl" No. "29 «L' 

Guaranteed Stockings, 1 i g . 

weight silk lisle, with extra spile 
heel and toe 



Box Q 

of «3 



Pai 



$1.00 



Box Q 
of «J 



$1.00 



Pure Thread Silk Stockings, with double garter welt and high spliced heel and 
toe, also lisle garter welt and sole, in black and colors, per pair, $1.50 and $2.25 



The "Bach-lor-Girl" Guar 



tlu\u' silk storkn/gi 



Throughout our store may be found wearing apparel to meet the 
irements of college girls at very reasonable prices. 



Chocolates, Bon Bons 
and Fancy Boxes 



Arthur D. Jones 



Canbiesi of excellence 

Made at our Beacon Street Store 



^eattj'ss 



165 Huntington Avenue 
Boston 

1C05 Beacon Street 
Brookline 



Mason and 
Contractor 



Prompt Attention Given to Jobbing 
of All Kinds 



76 KINGSTON STREET 
BOSTON 



Telephones: 2676 and Oxford 331 
Home, 803-7 Jamaica. 



.MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



j The Mercantile Heart of 

I New England 

I 

• Two Entire Buildings are required for 

I this great Business — one devoted to 

l Housefurnishings and Fancy Goods, 

■ the other to Wearing Apparel and 

} Dry Goods. 

I .... I 

I In Both Buildings kindred lines of \ 

[ merchandise are conveniently grouped 

) together to facilitate convenience in ) 

) shipping. ) 

I 



The Floor Area of these Two Buildings 
totals over 21 acres- a space much 



I greater than that of any other store. 

But, after all, an establishment of the size and character 
of "The Mercantile Heart of New England" is not merely a 
shopping place — it is an institution that means much to the com- ) 
munity, and which calls for the highest effort of all its executives \ 
to establish an efficiency in service that will be creditable to { 
: themselves and to its great family of patrons. 



Jordan Marsh Company 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



H. NEWTON MARSHALL CO. 

(Formerly Cutler-Marshall Company) 

PAINTING CONTRACTORS 
166 DEVONSHIRE STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

PROMINENT SCHOOL AND COLLEGE BUILDINGS PAINTED BY THIS COMPANY 



HARVARD UNIVERSITY 


Webster Hall 


Andover Theological School 


Dormitory, '05 
ANDOVER ACADEMY 


New Medical Schools 


New Law School 


Gymnasium 

EXETER ACADEMY 


Robinson Hall 


Emerson Hall 


Dunbar Hall 


Delta Phi Club 


NORMAL and LATIN SCHOOLS. Fenway, Boston 


Zeta Psi Club 


SEVENTH U \KI>. SCHOOL. M..klen, Mass. 


SI RACUSI- UNIVERSITY 


TUFTS COLLEGE 


New Gvmnasium 


Delta Tau Delta Club 


PRINCETON UNIVERSITY 


Delta .Upsilon Club 


Campbell Hall 


President Ham,lt..n\ Residence 


Graduate School 


YALE UNIVERSITY 


Wyman House 


Mason Laboratory 


ST. LAWRENCE UNIVERSITY, Canton. N. Y. 


Science Building 
SIMMONS COLLEGE 


New Gymnasium 


MT. PLEASANT SCHOOL, Washington, D. C. 


Main Building 


HIGH SCHOOL. Maiden, Mass. 


West Wing 
WILLIAMS COLLEGE 


JEFFERSON SCHOOL. Boston, Mass. 
LANE-IOHNSON SCHOOL. Washington. D. C. 
PLUNKLLL St 11 „ Piusheld. Mass 


Grace Chapin Hall 


Dormitory No. 1 


ST. MARYS SCHOOL, Melrose, Mass. 


Chi Psi Club 


MRS. SARGENT'S SCHOOL, Matteawan, N. Y. 


l)\RTMOUTII COLLEGE 




Tuck Hall 


HIGH SCHOOL, Rockland, Mass. 



"Choisa" 
Ceylon Tea 




Albert P. Smith Telephone, "Kichmond" 1 647 

Smith Brothers 
Putter, Cfjeeae anb Cgga 

2 and 4 Faneuil Hall Market 
and Basement No. 3 



V Ceil 



Packed in Parchment-lined 

One-pound and half-pound Canisters 

We invite comparisons with 

other Teas of similar prices 

S. S. PIERCE CO. 

BOSTON BROOKLINE 



BOSTON 



MASS. 



Sole Receivers of 
RANDOLPH CREAMERY 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



YES, we will transfer your baggage 

When going to and from 

SIMMONS COLLEGE 

Send your baggage by the 

ARMSTRONG TRANSFER CO. 

We give the best and most reliable service of any express com- 
pany in Boston 

We make more trips than any other company — four trips each 
way daily 

We have unequalled facilities for tracing baggage that has been 
delayed or gone astray 

Provided you purchase your railroad tickets in advance we 
can check your baggage from residence to destination, if you desire. 

Brookline Office: 1352 Beacon Street. Telephone BROOK. 3020 

Principal Office: 271 Albany Street, Boston. Telephone TREMONT 55 

Also offices in all Railroad Stations in Boston 



WHAT IT MEANS TO YOU 



Tiplness in filling orders Accuracy i: 



Special Attention Given to 
College Printing 

WARREN J. CRAWLEY 
PRINTER 

loosac Court Tel. 245-2 North Adams. Mas! 

THE FISK TEACHERS' 
AGENCIES. 



Agency Mam: 



sent free to any address 



2A Park Street, Boston; 70 College St., Orangeburg: 
610 Swetland Bldg., Portland; 156 Fifth Ave., New 
York; 28 E. Jackson Blvd.. Chicago; 2161 Shattuck 
Avenue, Berkeley; 1845 U Street, Washington; 920 
Cen. Sav. Bk. Bldg., Denver; 343 Douglas Bldg., Los 



THAYER, McNEIL 
& HODGKINS 

Convincing Effects in 

Distinctive and desirable 
Footwear — strong in charac- 
ter and taste — original, and 
fashioned from that grade of 
material which only sincere 
merchants use. They are 
modern, progressive, and 
practical shoes and attractive- 
ly priced. 

47 TEMPLE PLACE 
15 WEST ST. 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



ffBafflEf^T^ffERBURYftMPANY, 




HEADQUARTERS FOR SOUVENIRS 
OF THE COLLEGE 



BANNERS 

PENNANTS 

JEWELRY 




GOLD PINS 
POST CARDS 
ENGRAVING 



A. D. Maclachlan 

502 Boylston Street - 



Boston 




iEngltalj 
(Era Unnrn 



160 Tremont Street 

Over MoseWs 



Afternoon Tea Between "West and Boyla 
3.30-5.30 Streets 




MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 




D.B.UPDIKE 

Cbe 99crrgmount Press 

232 SUMMER ST. 
BOSTON 

PRINTER OF THE SIMMONS COLLEGE 

BULLETIN, fef THE PUBLICATIONS OF 

OTHER INSTITUTIONS OF LEARNING 

&c &c. fife. 

Officers and Students of Simmons College 
are invited to visit the Press, which is 
direftly opposite the South Station, Boston 



PUREST ICE IN BOSTON 



Independent Ice Co. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Offices: 
171 Second Street, East Cambridge, Mass. 

Connected by Telephone 

A. E. MARTELL COMPANY 

Designers and Manufacturers of 

LOOSE LEAF AND MANIFOLD BOOKS 
159 DEVONSHIRE STREET - - - BOSTON, MASS. 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



.:■*•■:-,■ .,. 




th* Electric City Engraving Co. 

BUFFALO, N.Y. 



WE MADE THE ENGRAVINGS FOR THIS BOOK. 



=a 








See how Easy it is, Tilly?" 



Show the new girl just once what can be done with Jell-O and then you will 
always be sure of one fine dish for dinner. She may spoil everything else, but she wil 
make a fine dessert of 



for she cannot go wrong there. 

And Jell-O isn't a dinner dish alone. It is served at lunch and 
supper, and is never out of place. 

Jell-O and hot water, without anything else, make these deli- 
cious dishes in a minute. 

There are seven delightful flavors and seven beautiful colors : 
Strawberry, Raspberry, Lemon, Orange, Cherry, Peach, Chocolate. 
At all grocers', 1 Oc. each. 

The splendid recipe book, "DESSERTS OF THE 
WORLD," in ten colors and gold, will be sent 
free to all who write and ask for it. 

THE GENESEE PURE FOOD CO., 
Le Roy, N. Y., and Bridgeburg, Can.